Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 122

Wine Glass

ca. 1851 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

Object Type
This wine glass is made in a typical Victorian mixture of styles: although the bowl is engraved with a riot of motifs, the stem is an opaque twist in the traditional Venetian manner. It is an example of Apsley Pellatt's so-called 'Anglo-Venetian' glass.

People
Apsley Pellatt IV (1791-1863) of the Falcon Glassworks, Blackfriars, London, was one of the chief innovators of the mid-19th century British glass industry. He learned about the historical techniques of glass-making by travelling about Europe viewing continental methods at first hand, and by rigorous experimentation. His Curiosities of Glass Making (1849) became an invaluable manual for his glass-making contemporaries.

Historical Associations
Pellatt won a prize medal at the Great Exhibition, where he displayed cut glass services, 'Anglo-Venetian' gilt and frosted glass, 'cameo-incrustations' (now called sulphides) and even lanterns and medical bottles. His two main exhibition pieces were a 24 foot high cut glass chandelier for 80 lights and an 'Alhambra-style' red, white and blue chandelier. John Tallis in his History and Description of the Crystal Palace (1852) declared Pellatt's work 'second to none in excellence or beauty'.

Object details

Categories
Object type
Materials and techniques
Clear glass with opaque twist, engraved
Brief description
Wine glass, England (possibly London), possibly made by Apsley Pellatt & Co., 1850-1850
Dimensions
  • Height: 14.0cm
  • Bowl diameter: 8.4cm
  • Foot diameter: 7.0cm
Dimensions checked: Measured; 07/07/1999 by Terry Diam. of foot 7.0cms
Style
Gallery label
  • Probably commissioned by the City of London, whose arms are included in the decoration, and made to commemorate the Great Exhibition of 1851.
  • British Galleries: TWO WINE GLASSES engraved with Exhibition motifs
    Apsley Pellat, the famous firm of glass manufacturers, showed many drinking vessels in their display, as well as a huge chandelier. The twisted white threads in both stems imitate Venetian glass. Many glasses in this style were engraved, using motifs relevant for the occasion - including the globe (signifying the international theme) and the crown (signifying royal support).(27/03/2003)
Object history
Possibly made for the royal tables at city banquets at 'The Albion' Banqueting Hall, London, in commemmoration of the Great Exhibition 1851
Possibly made in London at Apsley Pellat's Falcon glassworks
Summary
Object Type
This wine glass is made in a typical Victorian mixture of styles: although the bowl is engraved with a riot of motifs, the stem is an opaque twist in the traditional Venetian manner. It is an example of Apsley Pellatt's so-called 'Anglo-Venetian' glass.

People
Apsley Pellatt IV (1791-1863) of the Falcon Glassworks, Blackfriars, London, was one of the chief innovators of the mid-19th century British glass industry. He learned about the historical techniques of glass-making by travelling about Europe viewing continental methods at first hand, and by rigorous experimentation. His Curiosities of Glass Making (1849) became an invaluable manual for his glass-making contemporaries.

Historical Associations
Pellatt won a prize medal at the Great Exhibition, where he displayed cut glass services, 'Anglo-Venetian' gilt and frosted glass, 'cameo-incrustations' (now called sulphides) and even lanterns and medical bottles. His two main exhibition pieces were a 24 foot high cut glass chandelier for 80 lights and an 'Alhambra-style' red, white and blue chandelier. John Tallis in his History and Description of the Crystal Palace (1852) declared Pellatt's work 'second to none in excellence or beauty'.
Other number
0784 - Glass gallery number
Collection
Accession number
C.32-1975

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Record createdDecember 13, 1997
Record URL
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