Pair of Gates thumbnail 1
Pair of Gates thumbnail 2
+8
images
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Ironwork, Room 114c

Pair of Gates

1869-1872 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

These chancel gates from Salisbury Cathedral were in place by 1877. They result from the extensive work on restoring the cathedral carried out between 1863 and 1878 by the architect, George Gilbert Scott. The design for the chancel screen was probably the result of a collaboration between Scott and his favourite ironworker, Francis Skidmore of Coventry, and is clearly inspired by 12th to 13th century ironwork, such as the grille thought to be from the shrine of St Swithun, in Winchester Cathedral. The Salisbury screen can be compared with the Scott/Skidmore designs of 1862 for the Hereford Cathedral screen, Museum no. M.251-1984, which is far more elaborate. The Salisbury screen was removed amidst much controversy in 1959. Much of the screen was destroyed and these gates and the cross (M.5-2015) are the principal survivors.


Object details
Categories
Object type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Gate
  • Gate
Materials and techniques
Wrought iron, painted
Brief description
Pair of wrought iron, painted gates, designed by Gilbert Scott and made by Skidmore & Co., Coventry, 1869-1872.
Physical description
Pair of wrought iron gates, painted gold, with an undercoat of red. Stylized fleur-de-lys motifs adorn the top of the gates, with a palmette scroll nodding inwards at either end. Divided into several sections, separated by horizontal bars, each designed with different types of scrollwork. The bottom section features vertical scrolls; the second features a circular scroll design; the third features scrolls within pointed arches. Above this, a narrow small section features running scrollwork; above which are a total of six quatrefoils within large square sections. There is a square lock with a scrolled handle, set into one gate, with scrollwork around the keyhole. There is no key. The horizontal and vertical bars of the gate have surface decoration in the form of small punched circles, rectangles and groups of diagonal lines.
Dimensions
  • Height: 2.26m
  • Width: 2.13m
Object history
These chancel gates from Salisbury Cathedral were in place by 1877. They result from the extensive work on restoring the cathedral carried out between 1863 and 1878 by the architect, George Gilbert Scott. The design for the chancel screen was probably the result of a collaboration between Scott and his favourite ironworker, Francis Skidmore of Coventry, and is clearly inspired by 12th to 13th century ironwork, such as the grille thought to be from the shrine of St Swithun, in Winchester Cathedral. The Salisbury screen can be compared with the Scott/Skidmore designs of 1862 for the Hereford Cathedral screen, Museum no. M.251-1984, which is far more elaborate. The Salisbury screen was removed amidst much controversy in 1959. Much of the screen was destroyed and these gates and the cross (M.5-2015) are the principal survivors.
Subject depicted
Summary
These chancel gates from Salisbury Cathedral were in place by 1877. They result from the extensive work on restoring the cathedral carried out between 1863 and 1878 by the architect, George Gilbert Scott. The design for the chancel screen was probably the result of a collaboration between Scott and his favourite ironworker, Francis Skidmore of Coventry, and is clearly inspired by 12th to 13th century ironwork, such as the grille thought to be from the shrine of St Swithun, in Winchester Cathedral. The Salisbury screen can be compared with the Scott/Skidmore designs of 1862 for the Hereford Cathedral screen, Museum no. M.251-1984, which is far more elaborate. The Salisbury screen was removed amidst much controversy in 1959. Much of the screen was destroyed and these gates and the cross (M.5-2015) are the principal survivors.
Bibliographic references
  • Campbell, Marian Ironwork, London 1985, fig. 22, p. 28
  • Scott, George Gilbert, Personal and Professional Recollections, edited by Gavin Stamp, Stamford 1995, pp. 480,487
Collection
Accession number
M.4-1979

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Record createdApril 28, 2000
Record URL
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