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Grille

Grille

  • Place of origin:

    Saint-Dizier (probably, made)

  • Date:

    1899 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Guimard, Hector, born 1867 - died 1942 (designer)
    La fonderie Saint-Dizier (maker)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Wrought iron, the sections secured by nuts and bolts.

  • Credit Line:

    Given by John S. M. Scott

  • Museum number:

    M.221-2007

  • Gallery location:

    Ironwork, Room 114e, case EXP

When Hector Guimard (1867-1942) designed the Castel Henriette in 1899, he was at the peak of his career. The previous year, he had been commissioned to design the entrances to the new Paris Metro which he continued to do until 1904. His architecture achieved a seamless blend of art, design and technology. The Metro stations, as for much of the ironwork that decorated Guimard's fashionable villas and apartment blocks, were made up of a series of standardised, modular components. Elements such as the moulded, cast iron masks, suspended from cross bars in a repeat pattern around many of the entrances, have come to symbolise the Paris Metro, if not Paris itself. This window grille for the Castel Henriette, restored to its original colour, is made from standard strip and angle iron, forged into a restless, linear whiplash design which characterised Guimard's work and defined him as the greatest architectural practitioner of French Art Nouveau.

The Castel Henriette in the rue de Binelles, Sèvres was commissioned by Madame Hefty and built between 1899 and 1900. By the 1960s, the house had passed out of the family. Its last recorded use was as a backdrop for the film What's New Pussycat? in 1965, directed for United Artists by Clive Donner and starring Peter Sellers, Peter O'Toole, Woody Allen, Ursula Andress, Paula Prentiss, Burt Baccarach and Romy Schneider. In 1969, the Castel Henriette was regrettably demolished.

Physical description

Window screen, wrought iron, coloured with a light green paint.designed and made for the Castel Henriette, Sèvres. This grille is made from standard strip and angle iron, and is assembled into a restless, whiplash design.The grille consists of nine upright sections of extruded three-sided iron strip, U shaped in cross section, each end cut and bent into a semi-loop on all three sides. The central section is encased in an asymetrical loop of flat strip, held together by a slightly curved strip of flat iron towards the top and three whiplash curved sections with double-backed returns at each end at the base. The grille is held together by a series of nuts and bolts and has been restored to its original colour.

Place of Origin

Saint-Dizier (probably, made)

Date

1899 (made)

Artist/maker

Guimard, Hector, born 1867 - died 1942 (designer)
La fonderie Saint-Dizier (maker)

Materials and Techniques

Wrought iron, the sections secured by nuts and bolts.

Marks and inscriptions

No marks

Dimensions

Height: 217 cm, Width: 153 cm, Depth: 5.5 cm

Descriptive line

Window grille, Ironwork, France, 1899, designed by Hector Guimard.

Labels and date

WINDOW GRILLE
Wrought iron
France, probably made at the Saint-Dizier foundry, ca.1899
Designed by Hector Guimard (1867-1942)

When Hector Guimard designed the Castel Henriette in 1899, he was at the peak of his career. The previous year, he had been commissioned to design the entrances to the new Paris Metro which he continued to do until 1904. His architecture achieved a seamless blend of art, design and technology. The Metro stations, as for much of the ironwork that decorated Guimard's fashionable villas and apartment blocks, were made up of a series of standardised, modular components. Elements such as the moulded, cast iron masks, suspended from cross bars in a repeat pattern around many of the entrances, have come to symbolise the Paris Metro if not Paris itself. This window grille for the Castel Henriette, restored to its original colour, is made from standard strip and angle iron, forged into a restless, linear whiplash design which characterised Guimard's work and defined him as the greatest architectural practitioner of French Art Nouveau.

The Castel Henriette in the rue de Binelles, Sèvres (see illustration) was commissioned by Madame Hefty and built between 1899 and 1900. By the 1960s, the house had passed out of the family. Its last recorded use was as a backdrop for the film What's New Pussycat? in 1965, directed for United Artists by Clive Donner and starring Peter Sellers, Peter O'Toole, Woody Allen, Ursula Andress, Paula Prentiss, Burt Baccarach and Romy Schneider. In 1969, the Castel Henriette was regrettably demolished.

Given by John S.M. Scott
M.221-2007 [1994]

Materials

Wrought iron

Techniques

Forging

Categories

Architectural fittings; Metalwork

Collection

Metalwork Collection

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