Cup

1000-1200 (made)
Cup thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Islamic Middle East, Room 42, The Jameel Gallery
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This piece is a small bowl or large beaker. A glass worker made it of clear glass and decorated it in brown lustre. A double contour line marks the top and bottom of the walls.The space between is divided into ten vertical panels. These alternate between a wider panel decorated with a single teardrop, and a narrower panel containing a double spiral of scrollwork. The domed base is decorated with a single flower. There are several similar bowls of this type, and experts generally think that they were probably been made in Egypt, where one was found. They date them to the 11th or 12th century, when the country was ruled by the Fatimid dynasty (969-1171).


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Transparent glass, with lustre-painted decoration
Brief Description
Lustre glass cup, Egypt, 1000-1200.
Physical Description
This small bowl or large beaker is made of clear glass and decorated in brown lustre. The walls are defined top and bottom by a double contour line. The space between is divided into ten vertical panels, which alternate between a wider panel containing a single teardrop motif, and a narrower panel containing a double spiral of scrollwork. The domed base is decorated with a single flower. Bottom has pontil mark and does not stand properly. The walls of the vessel are thicker than most other lustre-painted vessels and may be indicative of its later date.
Dimensions
  • Height: 7.7cm
  • Maximum width: 12.9cm
Style
Gallery Label
  • Jameel Gallery Lustre Glass Cup Egypt 1000–1200 Glass decorated with designs in lustre was also produced in Egypt. This cup is contemporary with the lustre jar and the bowl depicting a Coptic priest, both from Cairo. Glass stained with lustre pigments Museum no. C.23-1932 (2006)
  • Lustre painting is applied after the vessel is finished, and the lustre is fixed by firing in a small reducing kiln. The technique deposits a thin layer of metallic copper and silver, which gives mother-of-pearl reflections or a variety of brilliant greens and golds.
Object history
Bought from Spink LTD (with C-23-29 and C24-1932) for £420.00.
Historical context
The last phase of painting with stains, usually attributed to Fatimid Egypt, is characterized by a restrained monochrome decoration applied only on the exterior surface. It shares a similar decorative program and thickness of glass with an example in the British Museum OA2902.5-17.2.
Summary
This piece is a small bowl or large beaker. A glass worker made it of clear glass and decorated it in brown lustre. A double contour line marks the top and bottom of the walls.The space between is divided into ten vertical panels. These alternate between a wider panel decorated with a single teardrop, and a narrower panel containing a double spiral of scrollwork. The domed base is decorated with a single flower. There are several similar bowls of this type, and experts generally think that they were probably been made in Egypt, where one was found. They date them to the 11th or 12th century, when the country was ruled by the Fatimid dynasty (969-1171).
Bibliographic Reference
Ashton, A.L.B., "Three new glass vessels painted in lustre," Burlington Magazine, LX, 1932, 293-4, Plate A.
Other Number
8258 - Glass gallery number
Collection
Accession Number
C.23-1932

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdDecember 13, 1997
Record URL