Edith Mozley thumbnail 1
Not currently on display at the V&A

Edith Mozley

Bust
1863 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

The sitter, who belonged to a Liverpool family and may have been introduced to Gibson by Liverpool friends, was sixteen years old when the bust was executed in Rome. She was the daughter of a rich and cultivated Liverpool banke and much loved in social and artistic circles in Florence. She was married to the younger son of Count Gigliucci of Fermo in the Marche, whose wife was the famous Soprano Clara Novello, daughter of Vincent Novello, founder of the London firm of music publishers. The bust remained in the house built by the sitter's husband in the Plaza Savonarola in Florence until given to the Museum by her daughter.

Gibson (1790-1866) was apprenticed to Messrs Franceys, the Liverpool firm of statuaries and later went to Rome where he received tuition from Canova and Thorwaldsen. Elected A.R.A in 1833 and RA in 1838. He became the leading English sculptor of his generation working in the Neoclassical style and was famous for such works as the Tinted Venus, Pandora, Mars and Cupid and Psyche and Zephers. He also executed public statues and busts. He bequeathed his property on his death to the Royal Academy.


Object details
Categories
Object type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Bust
  • Plinth for Bust of Edith Mozley by Gibson
Materials and techniques
Marble
Brief description
Bust, marble, of Edith Margaret Mozley, by John Gibson, English, made in Rome, 1863
Physical description
Bust, marble. The bust is truncated above the arms and the breasts. On the truncation in front is an inscription with the name of the sitter. Signed on the left side. The hair is parted in the middle and dressed in a snood behind. The eyeballs are blank. On a mottled green marble pedestal in three sections.
Dimensions
  • Bust on pallet weight: 75kg (nifill)
  • Estimated bust weight weight: 57~kg (nifill) (Note: Standard wooden pallets weigh 18kg, therefore estimated weight is 57kg~)
  • Bust only depth: 290mm (approx)
  • Bust only width: 380mm (approx)
  • Bust only height: 600mm (approx)
Marks and inscriptions
  • 'EDITH MARGARET MOZLEY' (on the front)
  • 'OPVS IONNIS GIBSON ROMAE' (signed on the left side)
Credit line
Given by the Contessa Bona Gigliucci
Object history
Given by the Contessa Gigliucci. A closely similar but slightly smaller plaster bust, painted in imitation of terracotta is in the Royal Academy of Arts.
Historical context
In a letter also in the collection Gibson wrote to Edith Mozley to encourage her 'to get a comb made like the one sculptured at the back of the bust'. He also advised that 'When they unpack the bust it must not be touched with the fingers.... place it for the moment within 6 feet from the window, covering the lower part so that the light streeks [sic] down upon the bust....'
Subjects depicted
Summary
The sitter, who belonged to a Liverpool family and may have been introduced to Gibson by Liverpool friends, was sixteen years old when the bust was executed in Rome. She was the daughter of a rich and cultivated Liverpool banke and much loved in social and artistic circles in Florence. She was married to the younger son of Count Gigliucci of Fermo in the Marche, whose wife was the famous Soprano Clara Novello, daughter of Vincent Novello, founder of the London firm of music publishers. The bust remained in the house built by the sitter's husband in the Plaza Savonarola in Florence until given to the Museum by her daughter.



Gibson (1790-1866) was apprenticed to Messrs Franceys, the Liverpool firm of statuaries and later went to Rome where he received tuition from Canova and Thorwaldsen. Elected A.R.A in 1833 and RA in 1838. He became the leading English sculptor of his generation working in the Neoclassical style and was famous for such works as the Tinted Venus, Pandora, Mars and Cupid and Psyche and Zephers. He also executed public statues and busts. He bequeathed his property on his death to the Royal Academy.
Bibliographic reference
Bilbey, Diane and Trusted, Marjorie. British Sculpture 1470-2000. A Concise Catalogue of the Collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum. London: Victoria and Albert Museum, 2002, p. 274, cat.no. 419
Collection
Accession number
A.15-1968

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Record createdJune 24, 2009
Record URL
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