Monument to Sir William Hillman thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Sculpture, Room 24, The Dorothy and Michael Hintze Galleries

Monument to Sir William Hillman

Relief
1800 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This Coade stone monument to Sir William Hillman, made by Coade and Sealy in 1800, was originally in the demolished church of St. James's, Hampstead Road, London.

Eleanor Coade (1733-1821) was a remarkable business woman. From 1769 onwards she manufactured a hard-wearing, ceramic artificial stone at the Coade Artificial Stone Manufactory in Lambeth, London. Cast from moulds, Coade stone was ideal for reproducing designs for architectural details and ornaments for interiors and gardens. The company produced Neo-classical forms and, later, Gothic Revival elements. Designers included John Flaxman, Thomas Banks, and Benjamin West. Often mistaken for natural stone, Coade stone had the advantage of being resistant to frost. As a result, many examples survive both in Britain and elsewhere in Europe. John Sealy was a cousin of Eleanor Coade and was made partner in the firm in 1799. Then the company was name and seal was changed to Coade and Sealy. On the death of Eleanor Coade the company was bought by William Croggon, who had worked there, but the business foundered in 1833, and Croggon died bankrupt in 1835. His son Thomas John Croggon refounded the firm in 1835, though by this time has moved away from Lambeth, and once the moulds had been sold in 1843, no further Coade stone was produced.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Coade Stone
Brief Description
Relief, Coade stone, Monument to Sir William Hillman, by Coade and Sealy, English, 1800
Physical Description
Signed and inscribed
Marks and Inscriptions
  • 'COADE & SEALY / LAMBETH / 1800' (at the bottom of the pedestal)
  • 'Near this place rests teh Body of / Sir WILLIAM HILLMAN Knt. / Of His Majesty's Board / of Green Cloth. / Late of New Cavendish Street, / Portland Place. / His Heart was benevolent, / His Charities Liberal, / And His Virtues without ostentation. / He died the 7th February 1793, / Aged 53 Years. / This Monument is erected / pursuant to the Will of / His only Sister ELIZTH. WALTER, / relict of Capt, JAMES WALTER / of Andover, Hants. / Son of JOHN WALTER, / relict of Capt, JAMES WALTER / of Andover, Hants. / Son of JOHN WALTER Esqr: MP / Late of Bushbridge House / in the Country of Surrey' (Inscribed on the face of the pedestal)
Gallery Label
Coade and Sealy Manufacture Monument to Sir William Hillman (1740–93) Signed and dated 1800 Sir William Hillman’s sister, Elizabeth Walter, commissioned this monument in ‘Coade stone’. This artificial, stone-like material was named after Eleanor Coade (1733–1821). She developed an artificial stone manufactory in 1769 that created monuments and decorative ornaments. The mock stone was versatile and durable and allowed the manufactory to create several variations of the same design. London Coade stone From the now demolished church of St James’s, Hampstead Road, London(2021)
Credit line
Lent by The Bishop of London and The London Diocesan Fund
Object history
Originally in the demolished church of St. James's, Hampstead Road, London. On loan from the London Diocesan Fund from 18 October 1967.
Subjects depicted
Summary
This Coade stone monument to Sir William Hillman, made by Coade and Sealy in 1800, was originally in the demolished church of St. James's, Hampstead Road, London.



Eleanor Coade (1733-1821) was a remarkable business woman. From 1769 onwards she manufactured a hard-wearing, ceramic artificial stone at the Coade Artificial Stone Manufactory in Lambeth, London. Cast from moulds, Coade stone was ideal for reproducing designs for architectural details and ornaments for interiors and gardens. The company produced Neo-classical forms and, later, Gothic Revival elements. Designers included John Flaxman, Thomas Banks, and Benjamin West. Often mistaken for natural stone, Coade stone had the advantage of being resistant to frost. As a result, many examples survive both in Britain and elsewhere in Europe. John Sealy was a cousin of Eleanor Coade and was made partner in the firm in 1799. Then the company was name and seal was changed to Coade and Sealy. On the death of Eleanor Coade the company was bought by William Croggon, who had worked there, but the business foundered in 1833, and Croggon died bankrupt in 1835. His son Thomas John Croggon refounded the firm in 1835, though by this time has moved away from Lambeth, and once the moulds had been sold in 1843, no further Coade stone was produced.
Bibliographic Reference
Gunnis, R., Dictionary of British Sculptors 1660-1851, (revised edition, first published London 1953), London, 1968, p. 108
Collection
Accession Number
LOAN:LON.DIOCES.FUND.2

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record createdJune 24, 2009
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