We don’t have an image of this object online yet. V&A Images may have a photograph that we can’t show online, but it may be possible to supply one to you. Email us at vaimages@vam.ac.uk for guidance about fees and timescales, quoting the accession number: 218-1903
Find out about our images

Not currently on display at the V&A

Spoon

1786-1787 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

A spoon is a type of household implement used (depending on the form and size) for serving, stirring, basting, eating etc, and consisting of a shallow bowl (usually oval, sometimes circular) and a handle (varying in length, curvature and style of decoration). From about the 1660s to the 1760s, the stem curved in the same direction of the bowl but thereafter, with the advent of spoons made in the 'Old English Pattern', the stem curved in the opposite direction of the bowl so that when a spoon is laid on a table both the bottom of the bowl and the terminal of the stem are in contact with the surface and the spoon is in a balanced position; hence on later spoons the decoration is on the front of the handle.

The styles of spoons vary tremendously, especially in the shape of the stem, the decoration of the bowl and the form of the terminal. The patterns of some spoons have distinctive names based on the shape and style of the handle, e.g. fiddle pattern, Old English Pattern, Onslow Pattern and dozens of others, both old and modern.


Object details

Categories
Object type
Materials and techniques
Silver, forged
Brief description
Silver, Newcastle upon Tyne hallmarks for 1786-87, mark of R. Pinkney & R. Scott
Physical description
Spoon of silver, handle turned down at the end, pointed bowl with a drop on the back.
Dimensions
  • Length: 8.375in
  • Width: 1.75in
Marks and inscriptions
  • Newcastle hallmarks for 1786-87
  • Mark of R. Pinkney and R. Scott
Credit line
Gift of J.H. Fitzhenry
Summary
A spoon is a type of household implement used (depending on the form and size) for serving, stirring, basting, eating etc, and consisting of a shallow bowl (usually oval, sometimes circular) and a handle (varying in length, curvature and style of decoration). From about the 1660s to the 1760s, the stem curved in the same direction of the bowl but thereafter, with the advent of spoons made in the 'Old English Pattern', the stem curved in the opposite direction of the bowl so that when a spoon is laid on a table both the bottom of the bowl and the terminal of the stem are in contact with the surface and the spoon is in a balanced position; hence on later spoons the decoration is on the front of the handle.

The styles of spoons vary tremendously, especially in the shape of the stem, the decoration of the bowl and the form of the terminal. The patterns of some spoons have distinctive names based on the shape and style of the handle, e.g. fiddle pattern, Old English Pattern, Onslow Pattern and dozens of others, both old and modern.
Bibliographic reference
Ian Pickford, Silver Flatware, English, Irish and Scottish, 1660-1980, Woodbridge, Antique Collectors; Club, 1983. ISBN. 0907462359
Collection
Accession number
218-1903

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest feedback

Record createdJune 24, 2009
Record URL
Download as: JSON