Every Man to his Station thumbnail 1
Every Man to his Station thumbnail 2
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Not currently on display at the V&A

Every Man to his Station

Board Game
ca. 1825 (published)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The game would be played with a teetotum, markers and counters. It has 33 illustrated playing spaces showing various houses, cottages and a windmill. Also portrayed are various occupations including a boatman, soldier, farm worker and jockey. The end space of the game in the centre of the sheet shows an illustration of five boys seated around a table. They appear to be playing a version of this very game.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Hand-coloured engraving on linen
Brief Description
Hand coloured moral race game, Every Man to his Station, published in England by Edward Wallis about 1825
Physical Description
Design: ENGRAVING, COLOURED BY HAND; 8 SECTIONS MOUNTED ON LINEN

No. of squares: 33

Squares illustrated: all

Square numbering: none

Squares titled: none

Subject of starting square: ?

Subject of ending square: 5 boys playing the game
Dimensions
  • Height: 39.7cm
  • Width: 50.6cm
Object history
no rules are available with the game; see also details under RULES





CGG-Games & Puzzles, 1991
Historical context
Type: race

Subject: moral

Rewards: unknown

Forfeits: unknown

No. of Players: 2 to 5 or 6

Equipment required: teetotum



Rules:

There are 33 illustrations showing various houses and cottages, a windmill and various 'walks of life' including a boatman, soldier, farm worker, and jockey. In the centre of the sheet, No. 33, is an illustration showing 5 boys seated around a table playing this game with a teetotum.



The pictorial label on the slip case shows a King, Bishop, sailor, soldier and a beggar and his dog.



VILLAGE PORTRAITS, LONDON, EDWARD WALLIS, 42 SKINNER STREET, ISLINGTON - game held by the Essex Institute Salem, Mass.

There is another similar game which closely resembles Every Man to His Station both in layout and subject matter called VILLAGE PORTRAITS. It is also without rules.

The game would be played with a teetotum, markers and counters. An agreed number of counters would be held by each player and placed in the central kitty. The squares with a plus value - either a counter from each player or the kitty, or an extra turn - would probably by 1, 9, 10, 23, 27, 29, 31, 32, 34 and 35 with 36 taking the kitty if landed on cleanly. The minus squares - giving a counter to each player or the kitty - would probably be 2, 3, 6, 19, 20, 22, 26 and 33. Action squares (read a poem, sing, dance, extra) with another turn or advancing one or more squares are probably 4, 7, 12, 14, 24, and 28. Staying squares (miss a turn or two) are probably 5, 11, 13, 15, 18, 25 and 30. The penalty for over-reaching 36 will be either missing a turn and staying where you are, moving backwards by the extra number or going back to the beginning.



Edward Wallis did not use lithographs; so Village Portraits should be an engraving. William Spooner from about 1835 was a great exponent of lithographs.



*Rules were devised by C Goodfellow using various other like moral games, 1994.



Rules placement: none
Subjects depicted
Summary
The game would be played with a teetotum, markers and counters. It has 33 illustrated playing spaces showing various houses, cottages and a windmill. Also portrayed are various occupations including a boatman, soldier, farm worker and jockey. The end space of the game in the centre of the sheet shows an illustration of five boys seated around a table. They appear to be playing a version of this very game.
Collection
Accession Number
E.1775-1954

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record createdMarch 4, 2000
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