Image of Gallery in South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, room 512M , Case MX8, Shelf 290

Portrait of a Gentleman and Two Children

Photograph
1860s (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

The carte de visite was patented in 1854 by the French photographer André-Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri, and soon became the most common type of photograph. Between four and six miniature portraits could be taken on one glass plate negative. Sitters then chose their favourites, which were printed, cut out and mounted onto calling cards. It was fashionable to exchange and collect images of family, friends, royalty and celebrities, into specially designed albums.


Object details

Category
Object type
TitlePortrait of a Gentleman and Two Children (generic title)
Materials and techniques
albumen print
Brief description
Photograph by T. Heaviside of Durham, 'Portrait of a Gentleman and Two Children', ca. 1860s, albumen print
Physical description
Portrait of a man with two young girls, one is seated on his lap and the other standing to his left hand side. The girls wear matching light-coloured dresses. All three subjects are staring directly at the camera.
Dimensions
  • Width: 63mm
  • Height: 105mm
Content description
Of note, the two girls in this photo appear to be the same ones as in E.615-1995.
Gallery label
Photography Centre 2018-20: William Carrick; Ashford Brothers & Co.; Cornelius Jabez Hughes; J.J. Rugg; R. Green; A.W. Turner; J.J. Mayall; Edwards & Simonton; Gregory & Eddy; T. Heaviside; R. James; J. Porter; Ross & Pringle; Southwell Brothers; Enrico Van Lint; Camille Silvy; Elliott & Fry; J. Chaufly; Hills & Saunders; Arthur Debenham; unknown photographers Cartes de visite 1850s–70s The carte de visite was patented in 1854 by the French photographer André-Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri, and soon became the most common type of photograph. Between four and six miniature portraits could be taken on one glass plate negative. Sitters then chose their favourites, which were printed, cut out and mounted onto calling cards. It was fashionable to exchange and collect images of family, friends, royalty and celebrities, into specially designed albums. Albumen prints Museum nos. E.625, 539, 794, 656, 638, 573, 670, 585, 619, 772, 731, 745, 720, 792, 793, 580, 533, 609, 671, 615, 614, 667, 495, 651, 493, 583, 639, 620, 589, 532-1995; 226-1967; E.514, 30-2009
Subjects depicted
Place depicted
Summary
The carte de visite was patented in 1854 by the French photographer André-Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri, and soon became the most common type of photograph. Between four and six miniature portraits could be taken on one glass plate negative. Sitters then chose their favourites, which were printed, cut out and mounted onto calling cards. It was fashionable to exchange and collect images of family, friends, royalty and celebrities, into specially designed albums.
Collection
Accession number
E.614-1995

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest feedback

Record createdMarch 24, 2009
Record URL
Download as: JSONIIIF Manifest