'So Long Frank Lloyd Wright Bowl' thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Boardroom

'So Long Frank Lloyd Wright Bowl'

Bowl
1994 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Mark Lindquist was one of the first American wood turners to present his works as sculptures, rather than functional objects. He began to make sculptural work in the early 1970s.

Lindquist has developed a range of unusual techniques to enable him to create large, energetic works. His signature 'plunge cuts', made with a chainsaw, give the interior of this bowl its furrowed texture. He began to use a chainsaw in this way in the 1970s. In contrast, the spiral on the exterior is very smooth and controlled. It was made using a rotary cutting tool (router) held on a robotic arm which Lindquist programmed to travel around the bowl. This is an early example of Lindquist's use of robotics. Around the base of the bowl, the spiral channel intersects with the plunge cuts to create a ring of small holes.

The title of the bowl is taken from a song by Simon and Garfunkel, and refers to the American architect Frank Lloyd Wright. The iconic spiral shape of Wright's Guggenheim Museum in New York is reflected in the shape of the bowl. Lindquist's work often makes deliberate references to other artists; for example, he made a series of vertical pieces relating to the work of sculptor Constantin Brancusi. This strategy of drawing together disparate art-forms is typical of postmodernism, a movement with which Lindquist consciously identifies.


object details
Category
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Burr maple, turned and carved using a chainsaw and router
Brief Description
'So Long Frank Lloyd Wright Bowl', turned and carved bowl of burr maple, Mark Lindquist, United States of America (Florida), 1994
Physical Description
Turned and carved maple burl bowl on a round pedestal base decorated with two incised lines. The everted bowl is carved with an uneven rim and smooth spirals on the outside. The spiral cut was made by using a rotary cutting tool (router) held on a robotic arm that was programmed to travel around the curved profile of the bowl, gradually cutting a gouge into the surface. In contrast, the interior of the bowl is carved with irregular, vertical troughs which are Lindquist’s signature chainsaw ‘plunge cut’.
Dimensions
  • Height: 8.5in
  • Diameter: 10.5in
Dimensions supplied by artist
Style
Credit line
Given by Donald Brecker and Mark Lindquist
Object history
The 'So Long Frank Lloyd Wright Bowl' formally features both the signature chainsaw 'plunge cut' and an early use of robotics. The spiral cut at the bottom of the piece was made with the use of robotics. A rotary cutting tool (router) held on a robotic arm was programmed to travel along the curved profile of the bowl. As Lindquist puts it in an e-mail, this technical experimentation results in a different relation between tool, artist and work. The piece is executed in maple burl. It is a favoured material of Lindquist's for its figure and homogenous internal structure.



The piece refers to the great American architect Frank Lloyd Wright via the title. It is taken from a 1970 Simon and Garfunkel song. The shape of the object is a reference to Wright's Guggenheim in New York City. This layered set of allusions is typically Postmodern. The title might also be taken as a Postmodern slogan of sorts.
Place Depicted
Literary ReferenceThe title of this bowl, 'So Long Frank Lloyd Wright Bowl', is taken from a song of the same name by Simon and Garfunkel, released in 1970.
Summary
Mark Lindquist was one of the first American wood turners to present his works as sculptures, rather than functional objects. He began to make sculptural work in the early 1970s.



Lindquist has developed a range of unusual techniques to enable him to create large, energetic works. His signature 'plunge cuts', made with a chainsaw, give the interior of this bowl its furrowed texture. He began to use a chainsaw in this way in the 1970s. In contrast, the spiral on the exterior is very smooth and controlled. It was made using a rotary cutting tool (router) held on a robotic arm which Lindquist programmed to travel around the bowl. This is an early example of Lindquist's use of robotics. Around the base of the bowl, the spiral channel intersects with the plunge cuts to create a ring of small holes.



The title of the bowl is taken from a song by Simon and Garfunkel, and refers to the American architect Frank Lloyd Wright. The iconic spiral shape of Wright's Guggenheim Museum in New York is reflected in the shape of the bowl. Lindquist's work often makes deliberate references to other artists; for example, he made a series of vertical pieces relating to the work of sculptor Constantin Brancusi. This strategy of drawing together disparate art-forms is typical of postmodernism, a movement with which Lindquist consciously identifies.
Bibliographic Reference
Adamson, Glenn, ‘Filling a Gap: Recent acquisitions of turned wood at the V&A’, V&A Online Journal, No.2, Autumn 2009, http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/journals/research-journal/issue-02/filling-a-gap-recent-acquisitions-of-turned-wood-at-the-v-and-a/ [accessed 24/02/2016].
Collection
Accession Number
W.1-2009

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record createdFebruary 26, 2009
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