Sugar Box and Cover thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Ceramics, Room 145

Sugar Box and Cover

ca. 1723-1724 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

This Meissen sugar box and cover would have been part of a coffee or tea set with matching decoration. The panels of delightful miniature Chinese-style scenes or 'Chinoiserie' are typical of the decoration developed by a talented new arrival at the factory in 1720, Johann Gregorius Höroldt. He was an ambitious young man (aged only twenty-three) and was no doubt induced to abandon his position at the rival porcelain factory in Vienna with the promise of improving his fortunes at Meissen. He soon developed a new range of rich colours and created a series of 'Chinoiserie' figure designs for the team of decorators to use and adapt on the different wares.

Höroldt also became an influential force in the Meissen factory's administration and management. He worked at there for forty-four years in total, witnessing many changes over the period. He died in 1775.

Object details

Categories
Object type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Sugar Box
  • Cover
Materials and techniques
Hard-paste porcelain, painted in enamels, gilded and with Böttger lustre
Brief description
Sugar box and cover of hard-paste porcelain, painted in enamels and gilded in the mannner of J.G. Höroldt, made at the Meissen porcelain factory, Meissen, ca. 1723-1724.
Physical description
Sugar box and cover of stepped octagonal shape, painted in enamels and gilded with Chinoiserie figure scenes, and the rims have plain gilded borders.
Dimensions
  • Width: 10.2cm
Style
Credit line
From the Arthur and Hilde Weiner Collection. Accepted by HM Government in lieu of inheritance tax and allocated to the V&A, 2006
Object history
Formerly in the Arthur and Hilde Weiner Collection.
Production
Painted in the style of Höroldt.
Subjects depicted
Summary
This Meissen sugar box and cover would have been part of a coffee or tea set with matching decoration. The panels of delightful miniature Chinese-style scenes or 'Chinoiserie' are typical of the decoration developed by a talented new arrival at the factory in 1720, Johann Gregorius Höroldt. He was an ambitious young man (aged only twenty-three) and was no doubt induced to abandon his position at the rival porcelain factory in Vienna with the promise of improving his fortunes at Meissen. He soon developed a new range of rich colours and created a series of 'Chinoiserie' figure designs for the team of decorators to use and adapt on the different wares.

Höroldt also became an influential force in the Meissen factory's administration and management. He worked at there for forty-four years in total, witnessing many changes over the period. He died in 1775.
Collection
Accession number
C.41:1, 2-2006

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Record createdFebruary 26, 2009
Record URL
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