Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level F , Case X, Shelf 311, Box K

The Mountain Nymph Sweet Liberty

Photograph
June 1866 (photographed), c. 1884 (printed)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

In late 1865 Julia Margaret Cameron began using a larger camera, which held a 15 x 12-inch glass negative. Early the next year she wrote to Henry Cole with great enthusiasm – but little modesty – about the new turn she had taken in her work.

Cameron initiated a series of large-scale, close-up heads. These fulfilled her photographic vision, a rejection of ‘mere conventional topographic photography – map-making and skeleton rendering of feature and form’ in favour of a less precise but more emotionally penetrating form of portraiture. Cameron also continued to make narrative and allegorical tableaux, which were larger and bolder than her previous efforts.


object details
Category
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Collotype
Brief Description
Photograph by Julia Margaret Cameron, 'The Mountain Nymph Sweet Liberty' (sitter Mrs. Keene), collotype, 1866, printed later probably before 1884
Physical Description
A photograph of a woman (Mrs. Keene) from the shoulders up with loose hair and looking straight ahead.
Dimensions
  • Height: 29.4cm
  • Width: 22.3cm
Dimensions taken from Victoria and Albert Museum Department of Prints, Drawings and Paintings Accession Register for 1990
Style
Credit line
Nevinson Bequest, 1990
Object history
Nevinson Bequest, 1990



One of a series of 8 photographs probably printed by J.B. Obernetter and Co., Munich, before 1884 [see stamp on E.2746-1990]



Inscribed on another print of the same image (whereabouts unknown): 'Come and trip it as you go,/On the light fantastic toe,/And in thy right hand lead with thee/The mountain nymph, Sweet Liberty'/John Milton, 'L'Allegro' 1632 / 'And Freedom rear'd in that august sunrise/ Her beautiful bold brow'./ Alfred Tennyson, 'The Poet', Poems.
Production
As the inscription visible on E.2746-1990 and E.2749-1990 indicate, this collotype was made from internegatives (negatives made from rephotographing prints)
Association
Literary ReferenceJohn Milton, 'L'Allegro', 1632
Summary
In late 1865 Julia Margaret Cameron began using a larger camera, which held a 15 x 12-inch glass negative. Early the next year she wrote to Henry Cole with great enthusiasm – but little modesty – about the new turn she had taken in her work.



Cameron initiated a series of large-scale, close-up heads. These fulfilled her photographic vision, a rejection of ‘mere conventional topographic photography – map-making and skeleton rendering of feature and form’ in favour of a less precise but more emotionally penetrating form of portraiture. Cameron also continued to make narrative and allegorical tableaux, which were larger and bolder than her previous efforts.

Bibliographic References
  • Series: Mike Weaver, Julia Margaret Cameron, University of Southampton and The Herbert Press, 1984
  • Cox, Julian and Colin Ford, with contributions by Joanne Lukitsh and Philippa Wright. Julia Margaret Cameron: The Complete Photographs. London: Thames & Hudson, in association with The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles and The National Museum of Photography, Film & Television, Bradford, 2003. ISBN: 0-500-54265-1Cat. no. 335, p. 226.
  • Victoria and Albert Museum Department of Prints, Drawings and Paintings Accession Register for 1990
Collection
Accession Number
E.2752-1990

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record createdFebruary 23, 2009
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