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Not currently on display at the V&A

White

Furnishing Fabric
1913 (made), 07/1914 (design registered)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The Omega Workshops at 33 Fitzroy Square were founded in 1913 by the designer and painter Roger Fry (1866-1934). He brought together a group of artists to design furniture, pottery, glass, textiles and entire schemes of interior decoration. Their radically abstract style, typified by this textile, was far ahead of its time and was influenced by developments in contemporary painting.

In keeping with the painting tradition, Fry believed that designs should not be too mechanical and should show evidence of the artist's hand. The workshops produced six printed linens which were used by the most daring clients as dress fabrics. The printers are said to have used a secret process to 'preserve the freedom and spontaneity of the original drawing'. 'White' was possibly named after the suffragette Amber Blanco-White, who rented a room at the top of the building in Fitzroy Square. It was available in several colourways.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Printed linen
Brief Description
Furnishing fabric 'White' of printed linen, possibly designed by Vanessa Bell for Omega Workshops, made by Besselièvre, Maromme, 1913
Physical Description
Furnishing fabric of printed linen with a linear, striped and step pattern over colour patches.
Dimensions
  • Height: 85cm
  • Width: 79.5cm
Marks and Inscriptions
3 [twice] (On the front)
Credit line
Given by Miss M. Hogarth
Object history
Miss M. Hogarth (given 1930) - gave textiles between 1928 and 1935 (MA/1/H2383).

Minute of 8.3.1930 in RPs regarding Circ. 3 - 11-1932 and T. 238-243-1931 by Director indicated: 'Examples of thse Omega fabrics are now difficult to procure and though they may not now be popular, yet they are interesting as representing a definite stage in the development of modern Decorative Art in this country. I should like, therefore, to recommend that the gift be very gratefully accepted. The pieces are small and can be accommodated in the portfolio. The duplicate pieces will be very useful, if required, for Circulation purposes.' Letter of acceptance dated 15/03/1930 and signed by Eric Maclagan. (30/2364)
Summary
The Omega Workshops at 33 Fitzroy Square were founded in 1913 by the designer and painter Roger Fry (1866-1934). He brought together a group of artists to design furniture, pottery, glass, textiles and entire schemes of interior decoration. Their radically abstract style, typified by this textile, was far ahead of its time and was influenced by developments in contemporary painting.



In keeping with the painting tradition, Fry believed that designs should not be too mechanical and should show evidence of the artist's hand. The workshops produced six printed linens which were used by the most daring clients as dress fabrics. The printers are said to have used a secret process to 'preserve the freedom and spontaneity of the original drawing'. 'White' was possibly named after the suffragette Amber Blanco-White, who rented a room at the top of the building in Fitzroy Square. It was available in several colourways.
Bibliographic Reference
Beyond Bloomsbury. Designs of the Omega Workshops 1913-19, The Courtauld Gallery, London, 2009, p.123, cat. 36A
Collection
Accession Number
T.242-1931

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record createdFebruary 21, 2009
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