Not currently on display at the V&A

Spoon

1916-1917 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

Omar Ramsden (1873-1939), son of a successful Sheffield manufacturer, had met Alwyn Carr (1872-1940) as a fellow design student at the Sheffield School of Art. In 1897, Ramsden won First Prize in the open competition for the design of a mace for the Sheffield City Council and turned to Carr for help with its execution leading to their formal partnership in 1898.

Business flourished and the workshop, now enlarged to include specialist chasers, engravers and enamellers as well as general silversmiths in new premises and showroom in Fulham. The character of the wide range of silver produced, domestic, ceremonial and religious, is linked by its apparent hand made appearance and an English decorative quality of historic reference to medievalism as well as occasionally, a subtle awareness of the sinuous lines of contemporary Art Nouveau. The partnership was dissolved in 1918, after which, Ramsden and Carr ran independent studios until their respective deaths.


Object details

Categories
Object type
Materials and techniques
Silver, hammered, cast and chased
Brief description
Silver, London hallmarks for 1916-17, mark of Ramsden and Carr.
Physical description
Silver with a rat tailed bowl and handle surmounted by a cast figure of Britannia with shield and trident. The inner side of the bowl chased.
Dimensions
  • Length: 7.8125in
  • Maximum width: 1.75in
Marks and inscriptions
  • London hallmarks for 1916-17
  • Mark of Ramsden and Carr
Credit line
Gift of Mrs. E. Delieb
Summary
Omar Ramsden (1873-1939), son of a successful Sheffield manufacturer, had met Alwyn Carr (1872-1940) as a fellow design student at the Sheffield School of Art. In 1897, Ramsden won First Prize in the open competition for the design of a mace for the Sheffield City Council and turned to Carr for help with its execution leading to their formal partnership in 1898.

Business flourished and the workshop, now enlarged to include specialist chasers, engravers and enamellers as well as general silversmiths in new premises and showroom in Fulham. The character of the wide range of silver produced, domestic, ceremonial and religious, is linked by its apparent hand made appearance and an English decorative quality of historic reference to medievalism as well as occasionally, a subtle awareness of the sinuous lines of contemporary Art Nouveau. The partnership was dissolved in 1918, after which, Ramsden and Carr ran independent studios until their respective deaths.
Collection
Accession number
CIRC.616-1954

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest feedback

Record createdDecember 24, 2008
Record URL
Download as: JSON