Dish thumbnail 1
Dish thumbnail 2
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images
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Ceramics, Room 145

Dish

ca. 1888-98 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This dish was produced by the studio of William de Morgan whose output included some of the most distinctive wares of the nineteenth century art-pottery movement. His studio, with a focus on the creation of artistic wares and the tireless experiements of De Morgan himself to reproduce various colours and glazes, was regarded as the antithesis of the large, impersonal, industrialised factories. De Morgan was greatly influenced by Iznik ceramics, and aimed to perfect the vibrant turquoises and blues of such wares in what he termed his 'Persian' style, as demonstrated in the colours and design of this dish.

De Morgan moved his pottery several times during his career to meet the changing demands of his life and work, first at Chelsea (1872-82), then at Merton Abbey (1882-88) and finally at Fulham (1888-1898) after which De Morgan played an increasingly distant part in the company. This dish, although unmarked and undated, was probably made during the early years of the Fulham period when De Morgan produced some of his most exciting designs.

De Morgan was also associated with the Arts and Crafts movement in Britain producing ceramics for William Morris


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Earthenware, lead glaze
Brief Description
Dish by William de Morgan, depicting a peacock in enamel colours, about 1888
Physical Description
Deep saucer-shaped dish painted in enamel colours on a greyish crackled slip. the main design is of a peacock spreading its tail on lawn, the birds body being of purple, its legs blue and its tail mainly purple excepting its eyes that are turqoiuse. there is a naturalistically coloured rose bush in the background. the reverse of the dish is painted with concentric blue circles.
Dimensions
  • Diameter: 41.5cm
Marks and Inscriptions
(unmarked)
Gallery Label
Dish Designed by William De Morgan, Possibly made at the De Morgan pottery, Merton Abbey, England, about 1885 Earthenware with painted decoration in coloured glazes C.261-1915 Given by Mr Archibald Anderson(23/05/2008)
Credit line
Given by Mr Archibald Anderson
Object history
Exhibited at the 'British Design at Home' exhibition held in Japan.
Subjects depicted
Summary
This dish was produced by the studio of William de Morgan whose output included some of the most distinctive wares of the nineteenth century art-pottery movement. His studio, with a focus on the creation of artistic wares and the tireless experiements of De Morgan himself to reproduce various colours and glazes, was regarded as the antithesis of the large, impersonal, industrialised factories. De Morgan was greatly influenced by Iznik ceramics, and aimed to perfect the vibrant turquoises and blues of such wares in what he termed his 'Persian' style, as demonstrated in the colours and design of this dish.



De Morgan moved his pottery several times during his career to meet the changing demands of his life and work, first at Chelsea (1872-82), then at Merton Abbey (1882-88) and finally at Fulham (1888-1898) after which De Morgan played an increasingly distant part in the company. This dish, although unmarked and undated, was probably made during the early years of the Fulham period when De Morgan produced some of his most exciting designs.



De Morgan was also associated with the Arts and Crafts movement in Britain producing ceramics for William Morris
Collection
Accession Number
C.261-1915

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record createdDecember 15, 1999
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