Royal Oak and Ivy thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 118a

Royal Oak and Ivy

Furnishing Fabric
1799 (printed)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
For the first 20 years of the19th century the finest and most expensive printed furnishings were polychrome woodblock-printed cottons, the technique used here. This fabric might have been used for curtains or upholstery. In this period it was fashionable for the different furnishings used in a room, including window curtains and upholstery fabric, to match or complement each other.

People
Richard Ovey, for whom this fabric was printed, was a leading linen draper of the time whose customers included the Prince of Wales. Although he styled himself 'furniture printer', he did not actually print any fabrics. Instead, he commissioned designs from different printworks, which he then sold at his shop in Covent Garden, London.

Materials & Making
This fabric is blockprinted in a colour scheme known as 'drab style', which originated about 1799 and was particularly fashionable in the years up to 1807. It continued to be used for block-printed chintzes until about 1815. It had a restricted range of browns, yellows and greens which were made by adding blue to yellow, plus occasionally blue by itself. The availability of the dye quercitron for a fast yellow encouraged the style. The 15-year patent on that dye ran out in 1799, after which it became generally available.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Block-printed cotton and pencilled
Brief Description
Furnishing fabric 'Royal Oak and Ivy' of block-printed cotton, made by Bannister Hall for Richard Ovey, 1799
Physical Description
Furnishing fabric of block-printed cotton and pencilled (painted) blue. With a 'demy' chintz design lacking madder colours. With a design of royal oak and ivy.
Dimensions
  • Height: 86.4cm
  • Width: 66cm
  • Height: 34in
  • Width: 26in
  • Pattern repeat length: 51.8cm
  • Pattern repeat width: 44.5cm
Gallery Label
British Galleries: From 1790 to 1831 Richard Ovey was the leading English merchant for 'furniture prints'. He commissioned designs from various printworks, particularly in Lancashire for his shop in Covent Garden, London. The design for this textile is inscribed 'R.Ovey's favourite pattern (do it well)'.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
Given by the Henry Francis du Pont Winterthur Museum
Object history
Printed at Bannister Hall, Lancashire
Production
Made 20/07/1799
Subjects depicted
Summary
Object Type
For the first 20 years of the19th century the finest and most expensive printed furnishings were polychrome woodblock-printed cottons, the technique used here. This fabric might have been used for curtains or upholstery. In this period it was fashionable for the different furnishings used in a room, including window curtains and upholstery fabric, to match or complement each other.

People
Richard Ovey, for whom this fabric was printed, was a leading linen draper of the time whose customers included the Prince of Wales. Although he styled himself 'furniture printer', he did not actually print any fabrics. Instead, he commissioned designs from different printworks, which he then sold at his shop in Covent Garden, London.

Materials & Making
This fabric is blockprinted in a colour scheme known as 'drab style', which originated about 1799 and was particularly fashionable in the years up to 1807. It continued to be used for block-printed chintzes until about 1815. It had a restricted range of browns, yellows and greens which were made by adding blue to yellow, plus occasionally blue by itself. The availability of the dye quercitron for a fast yellow encouraged the style. The 15-year patent on that dye ran out in 1799, after which it became generally available.
Collection
Accession Number
CIRC.86-1960

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record createdDecember 15, 1999
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