T 1000 Weltempfaenger thumbnail 1
T 1000 Weltempfaenger thumbnail 2
+1
images
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
20th Century, Room 76

This object consists of 2 parts, some of which may be located elsewhere.

T 1000 Weltempfaenger

Radio
1963 (designed), 1963 (manufactured)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This radio was designed to receive transmissions from all over the world (its name translates as 'world receiver'). The controls of the various wavelengths, therefore, are complex and required a thick user manual, stored in the drop-down cover. Its portability and the presence of so many aerials, dials and buttons give this radio the character of a piece of military or surveillance equipment, even though it was designed for the consumer market. Perhaps this reflects the circumstances of its manufacture, at the height of the Cold War, in what was then West Germany. In the early 1960s the ability to receive radio broadcasts from all over the world was a symbol of democratic freedom: freedom that was denied to the citizens of East Germany beyond the 'Iron Curtain'.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 4 parts.

  • Radio
  • Power Cable
  • Manual
  • Manual
Materials and Techniques
Aluminium, electronics
Brief Description
T1000 Weltempfaenger radio, designed by Dieter Rams, manufactured by Braun, West Germany, 1961
Physical Description
Oblong aluminium radio with drop down flap on the front, revealing dials and controls.
Dimensions
  • Height: 24.5cm
  • Width: 36.2cm
  • Depth: 13.4cm
Style
Summary
This radio was designed to receive transmissions from all over the world (its name translates as 'world receiver'). The controls of the various wavelengths, therefore, are complex and required a thick user manual, stored in the drop-down cover. Its portability and the presence of so many aerials, dials and buttons give this radio the character of a piece of military or surveillance equipment, even though it was designed for the consumer market. Perhaps this reflects the circumstances of its manufacture, at the height of the Cold War, in what was then West Germany. In the early 1960s the ability to receive radio broadcasts from all over the world was a symbol of democratic freedom: freedom that was denied to the citizens of East Germany beyond the 'Iron Curtain'.
Collection
Accession Number
W.12:1 to 3-2007

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record createdOctober 1, 2008
Record URL