Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Ceramics, Room 145

Jar

about 1700 (made)
Place Of Origin

Spanish potters introduced the potters-wheel and tin-glazing technology to Mexico in the early 16th century. Mexico City and Puebla became the centres for ceramic production. Initially Mexican tin-glazed ceramics were strongly influenced by Spanish maiolica pottery.

In 1565 Spain established a new trade from China to compete with Portuguese merchants. Cargoes of Chinese porcelain were shipped across the Pacific Ocean to Mexico, where they were carried overland via Puebla before being shipped on to Spain. These Chinese exports strongly influenced local potters, who combined Chinese blue-and-white decorative schemes with uniquely Mexican features, such as the distinctive quetzal bird motif.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Tin-glazed earthenware
Brief Description
Storage jar, made in Puebla, Mexico, about 1700, tin-glazed earthenware with blue and white decoration
Physical Description
Large earthenware storage jar with tin-glazed decoration in blue and white in Chinese style. A drilled hole in the lower part of the side, probably added to fit a tap.
Dimensions
  • Height: 47.6cm
  • Diameter: 34.9cm
Gallery Label
Jar Made in Puebla de los angeles , Mexico 17th century Tin-glazed earthenware C.33-1931 A.P. Maudslay Bequest(16/07/2008)
Credit line
Bequeathed by A. P. Maudslay
Subject depicted
Summary
Spanish potters introduced the potters-wheel and tin-glazing technology to Mexico in the early 16th century. Mexico City and Puebla became the centres for ceramic production. Initially Mexican tin-glazed ceramics were strongly influenced by Spanish maiolica pottery.



In 1565 Spain established a new trade from China to compete with Portuguese merchants. Cargoes of Chinese porcelain were shipped across the Pacific Ocean to Mexico, where they were carried overland via Puebla before being shipped on to Spain. These Chinese exports strongly influenced local potters, who combined Chinese blue-and-white decorative schemes with uniquely Mexican features, such as the distinctive quetzal bird motif.
Bibliographic References
  • Maria, Antonia Cassanovas ed., Talaveras de Puebla: Ceramica colonial Mexicana Siglios XVII a XXI, Barcelona 2007, pp. 67-69, figs. 16; 18
  • For further information see object information file in Ceramics and Glass section office.
Collection
Accession Number
C.33-1931

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record createdJuly 16, 2008
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