Theatre Costume

ca. 1972 (made)
Theatre Costume thumbnail 1
Theatre Costume thumbnail 2
+4
images
Not currently on display at the V&A

Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Roxy Music was a band formed around an image of faded glamour, and of Hollywood's heyday past. Their music was experimental and art-school, and as well as being a defining band in the musical era that came to be known as Glam Rock, their influence was felt in Punk and the New Romantics. Their explorations with synthesisers and electronic sounds paved the way for experimental popular music right through to the present, and were orchestrated by artist and band member Brian Eno, who became one of the most important record-producers of the 20th Century.

Eno described himself as an "electronic technologic non-musician", having no formal training in musicianship, but experimenting with avant-garde sound technologies whilst at university. He played a major role in the direction of Roxy's sound, but also clashed with singer Bryan Ferry over image issues. Despite the flamboyant image employed by the whole band, Eno's extrovert presence on stage, in costumes such as this one, and enthusiasm for interviews and outside projects, drew both audience and critical attention away from the band as a whole and away from Ferry's original concept. Soon after their second album For Your Pleasure was recorded, the inner sleeve of which has Eno posing in this outrageous costume, Ferry forced Eno to leave.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.
(Some alternative part names are also shown below)
  • Theatre Costume
  • Rock and Pop Costume
  • Jacket
  • Theatre Costume
  • Rock and Pop Costume
  • Trousers
Brief Description
Stage costume worn by Brian Eno, ca.1972
Physical Description
Stage costume worn by Brian Eno
Dimensions
  • Height: 152cm
  • Width: 60cm
  • Depth: 30cm
  • Jacket collar to sleeve cuff ( laid flat) length: 78cm
  • Jacket shoulder to shoulder ( laid flat) width: 71cm
  • Pants waist to hem ( laid flat) length: 114cm
  • Width:
  • Pants waist across ( laid flat) width: 37cm
  • Pants hems ( laid flat) width: 101cm
Gallery Label
Costume worn by Brian Eno 1973 Brian Eno first came to prominence as the keyboard player of the 1970s glam and art rock band Roxy Music. This costume was designed by Carol McNicoll, his partner at the time. Eno wore it on stage and on the inside cover of Roxy Music's 1973 album 'For Your Pleasure'. [50 words] Rayon and feathers Designed by Carol McNicoll Given by Brian Eno Museum no. S.156, 157-1977(March 2009 - February 2012)
Credit line
Given by Brian Eno
Summary
Roxy Music was a band formed around an image of faded glamour, and of Hollywood's heyday past. Their music was experimental and art-school, and as well as being a defining band in the musical era that came to be known as Glam Rock, their influence was felt in Punk and the New Romantics. Their explorations with synthesisers and electronic sounds paved the way for experimental popular music right through to the present, and were orchestrated by artist and band member Brian Eno, who became one of the most important record-producers of the 20th Century.



Eno described himself as an "electronic technologic non-musician", having no formal training in musicianship, but experimenting with avant-garde sound technologies whilst at university. He played a major role in the direction of Roxy's sound, but also clashed with singer Bryan Ferry over image issues. Despite the flamboyant image employed by the whole band, Eno's extrovert presence on stage, in costumes such as this one, and enthusiasm for interviews and outside projects, drew both audience and critical attention away from the band as a whole and away from Ferry's original concept. Soon after their second album For Your Pleasure was recorded, the inner sleeve of which has Eno posing in this outrageous costume, Ferry forced Eno to leave.
Collection
Accession Number
S.156 to 157-1977

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record createdJuly 16, 2008
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