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Miniature thumbnail 2
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Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Gold, Silver and Mosaics, Room 71, The Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Galleries

Miniature

1852 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The youngest son of William I of Orange, Frederick Henry (1584-1647) was born only six months before his father's assassination. He succeeded his brother as Stadtholder of the Dutch Republic. His time in power was marked by significant military triumphs and flourishing arts.

In the 17th century, new techniques of painting enamels allowed delicate portraits resembling tiny oil paintings to be created. These enamel miniatures were first fashionable in continental Europe, but were particularly in vogue in Britain from the 1720s to 1760s. Henry Bone (1755-1834) was a successful enameller in England. As a boy, he worked in William Cookworthy's porcelain factory in Plymouth. It was there that he was introduced to the art of enamel painting. He exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1781 and became a Royal Academician in 1811. Many of his enamel portraits are copies of older full-scale paintings, including a series depicting prominent men and women from the Elizabethan period. His sons, Henry Pierce Bone (1779-1855) and William Bone Senior (active 1810-43), followed in his footsteps and became enamellers. Like his father, Henry Pierce Bone made enamel copies of paintings of historical figures.

Sir Arthur Gilbert and his wife Rosalinde formed one of the world's great decorative art collections, including silver, mosaics, enamelled portrait miniatures and gold boxes. Arthur Gilbert donated his extraordinary collection to Britain in 1996.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 3 parts.

  • Miniature
  • Inner Frame
  • Frame
Materials and Techniques
Enamel on copper, gilt wood
Brief Description
Enamel miniature on copper of Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange, Count of Nassau, with a gilt wood frame, England, 1852, by Henry Pierce Bone.
Physical Description
Rectangular miniature portrait of Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange, Count of Nassau. The sitter is depicted three-quarter length wearing armour, with the Order of the Garter and holding a helmet. He stands in front of a red drapery swag and a landscape. The frame is gilt-wood.
Dimensions
  • Height: 38cm
  • Width: 32.7cm
  • Depth: 4.8cm
Marks and Inscriptions
The inscription incorrectly idenitifies the sitter as 'Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden / Sept 1852 Painted by Henry Bone from a picture / in the Gallery of the Earl of Craven Combe Abbey / Warwickshire' (On the counter enamel)
Gallery Label
Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange, Count of Nassau 1852 The younger son of William I of Orange, Frederick Henry (1584–1647) succeeded his half-brother as Stadtholder of the Dutch Republic. England; Henry Pierce Bone (1779–1855) Enamel on copper in later gilded wood frame Signed and dated on counter-enamel; inscribed on counter-enamel incorrectly identifying sitter as ‘Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden, Sept 1852 Painted by Henry Pierce Bone from a picture in the Gallery of the Earl of Craven Combe Abbey, Warwickshire’ Museum no. Loan:Gilbert.231:1-2008(2009)
Credit line
The Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Collection on loan to the Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Object history
Provenance: H.P. Bone sale, Christie's, London, lot 142 (?), March 13 1856. Sale, Christie's, London, lot 25, April 21, 1998. Sale, Christie's, London, lot 145, 01/04/1997.
Subject depicted
Summary
The youngest son of William I of Orange, Frederick Henry (1584-1647) was born only six months before his father's assassination. He succeeded his brother as Stadtholder of the Dutch Republic. His time in power was marked by significant military triumphs and flourishing arts.



In the 17th century, new techniques of painting enamels allowed delicate portraits resembling tiny oil paintings to be created. These enamel miniatures were first fashionable in continental Europe, but were particularly in vogue in Britain from the 1720s to 1760s. Henry Bone (1755-1834) was a successful enameller in England. As a boy, he worked in William Cookworthy's porcelain factory in Plymouth. It was there that he was introduced to the art of enamel painting. He exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1781 and became a Royal Academician in 1811. Many of his enamel portraits are copies of older full-scale paintings, including a series depicting prominent men and women from the Elizabethan period. His sons, Henry Pierce Bone (1779-1855) and William Bone Senior (active 1810-43), followed in his footsteps and became enamellers. Like his father, Henry Pierce Bone made enamel copies of paintings of historical figures.



Sir Arthur Gilbert and his wife Rosalinde formed one of the world's great decorative art collections, including silver, mosaics, enamelled portrait miniatures and gold boxes. Arthur Gilbert donated his extraordinary collection to Britain in 1996.
Bibliographic References
  • Coffin, Sarah and Bodo Hofstetter. Portrait Miniatures in Enamel. London: Philip Wilson Publishers Ltd. in association with the Gilbert Collection, 2000. 168 p., ill. Cat. no. 16, p. 64. ISBN 0856675334.
  • The Exhibition of the Royal Academy of Arts MDCCCLIV, London : William Clowes and Sons, 1854666
Other Numbers
  • MIN 67 - Arthur Gilbert Number
  • MM 297 - Arthur Gilbert Number
Collection
Accession Number
LOAN:GILBERT.231:1 to 3-2008

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record createdJune 26, 2008
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