Miniature thumbnail 1
Miniature thumbnail 2
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Gold, Silver and Mosaics, Room 71, The Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Galleries

Miniature

1822 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Sir Hugh Myddelton was a Member of Parliament from 1603 to 1628 and a successful London goldsmith. He also directed an engineering project to supply the City of London with water, through a series of canals sourced from springs near Ware, Hertfordshire. Bone's pencil drawing of this portrait of Sir Hugh is in the National Portrait Gallery.

In the 17th century, new techniques of painting enamels allowed delicate portraits resembling tiny oil paintings to be created. These enamel miniatures were first fashionable in continental Europe, but were particularly in vogue in Britain from the 1720s to 1760s. Henry Bone (1755-1834) was a successful enameller in England. As a boy, he worked in William Cookworthy's porcelain factory in Plymouth. It was there that he was introduced to the art of enamel painting. He exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1781 and became a Royal Academician in 1811. Many of his enamel portraits are copies of older full-scale paintings, including a series depicting prominent men and women from the Elizabethan period. His sons, Henry Pierce Bone (1779-1855) and William Bone Senior (active 1810-43), followed in his footsteps and became enamellers. Like his father, Henry Pierce Bone made enamel copies of paintings of historical figures.

Sir Arthur Gilbert and his wife Rosalinde formed one of the world's great decorative art collections, including silver, mosaics, enamelled portrait miniatures and gold boxes. Arthur Gilbert donated his extraordinary collection to Britain in 1996.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Enamel on copper, gilt wood, gesso and glass
Brief Description
Enamel miniature on copper of Sir Hugh Myddleton, glazed and in a gilt wood frame, England, 1822, by Henry Bone R.A. (1755-1834).
Physical Description
Rectangular portrait miniature of Sir Hugh Myddleton depicted facing right wearing a black and brown coat with jewelled buttons, white ruff and cuffs, a black gown and a gold medallion. The miniature is in a frame of gilt gesso and wood with glass.
Dimensions
  • Height: 35.5cm
  • Width: 31.9cm
  • Depth: 5.4cm
Marks and Inscriptions
  • Signed, dated and inscribed 'Sir Hugh Myddleton, Knight & Baronet / Compleated the Newn River, A.D. 1613 / He was an able Engineer, &&-Oct. 1613. / Painted by permission of the Worshipful / Company of Goldsmiths, by Henry Bone / R.A. Enamel painter to His Majesty & / Enamel Painter to H.R.H. The Duke of York / from a picture by Cornelius Jansen in the / Goldsmiths Hall, London / London / Aug.-1822'. (On the counter enamel)
  • Inscribed 'Enamel HBone R.A.' (On the matte)
Gallery Label
Sir Hugh Myddelton 1822 Sir Hugh Myddelton was a Member of Parliament from 1603 to 1628 and a successful London goldsmith. He also directed an engineering project to supply the City of London with water through canals sourced from springs near Ware, Hertfordshire. England, Henry Bone (1755–1834), after Cornelius Jansen (1593–1661) Enamel on copper with original gilded matte surround, in later gesso and wood frame Signed, dated and inscribed on counter-enamel ‘Sir Hugh Myddleton, Knight & Baronet Compleated the Newn River, A.D. 1613 He was an able Engineer, &&–Oct. 1613 Painted by permission of the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths, by Henry Bone R.A. Enamel painter to His Majesty & Enamel Painter to H.R.H. The Duke of York from a picture by Cornelius Jansen in the Goldsmiths Hall, London, London Aug.–1822’ Museum no. Loan:Gilbert.229-2008(2009)
Credit line
The Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Collection on loan to the Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Object history
Provenance: Trustees of the Earl of Lonsdale, March 19, 1980. Christie's, London, lot 39.
Production
After Cornelius Jansen
Subjects depicted
Summary
Sir Hugh Myddelton was a Member of Parliament from 1603 to 1628 and a successful London goldsmith. He also directed an engineering project to supply the City of London with water, through a series of canals sourced from springs near Ware, Hertfordshire. Bone's pencil drawing of this portrait of Sir Hugh is in the National Portrait Gallery.



In the 17th century, new techniques of painting enamels allowed delicate portraits resembling tiny oil paintings to be created. These enamel miniatures were first fashionable in continental Europe, but were particularly in vogue in Britain from the 1720s to 1760s. Henry Bone (1755-1834) was a successful enameller in England. As a boy, he worked in William Cookworthy's porcelain factory in Plymouth. It was there that he was introduced to the art of enamel painting. He exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1781 and became a Royal Academician in 1811. Many of his enamel portraits are copies of older full-scale paintings, including a series depicting prominent men and women from the Elizabethan period. His sons, Henry Pierce Bone (1779-1855) and William Bone Senior (active 1810-43), followed in his footsteps and became enamellers. Like his father, Henry Pierce Bone made enamel copies of paintings of historical figures.



Sir Arthur Gilbert and his wife Rosalinde formed one of the world's great decorative art collections, including silver, mosaics, enamelled portrait miniatures and gold boxes. Arthur Gilbert donated his extraordinary collection to Britain in 1996.
Bibliographic References
  • Walker, Richard. 'Henry Bone's Pencil Drawings in the National Portrait Gallery', The Walpole Society, Vol. LXI, 1999, p. 218.
  • Coffin, Sarah and Bodo Hofstetter. Portrait Miniatures in Enamel. London: Philip Wilson Publishers Ltd. in association with the Gilbert Collection, 2000. 168 p., ill. Cat. no. 12, pp. 58-59. ISBN 0856675334.
Other Numbers
  • 1996.775.1 - The Gilbert Collection, Somerset House
  • MIN 10 - Arthur Gilbert Number
  • MM 297 - Arthur Gilbert Number
Collection
Accession Number
LOAN:GILBERT.229-2008

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdJune 26, 2008
Record URL