Theatre Costume thumbnail 1
Not currently on display at the V&A

Theatre Costume

1970s (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Eve was a small Central London night club which opened in 1953 and was well-known for its imaginative floor-shows. Its founder, Helen O'Brien, devised witty entertainments which contained all the elements traditionally associated with glamorous night clubs - music, dance and parades of attractive showgirls - but presented them in a highly original way. Her designer, Ronald Cobb, created the costumes for sequences with such unexpected themes as Shakespeare's plays, Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, and The Mind of Goya. The club appealed to a sophisticated audience that enjoyed spotting the references.

In the 1970s the majority of the Eve showgirls were topless. Their costumes were minimal but elaborate, no more than a headdress, sleeves and a G-string, but all incorporated amusing references and symbols appropriate to the theme. There may once have been sleeves with this costume but only the headdress and G-string survive.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.
(Some alternative part names are also shown below)
  • Theatre Costume
  • Cabaret Costume
  • G-String
  • Theatre Costume
  • Cabaret Costume
  • Headdress
Brief Description
Moonlight costume worn by a showgirl at Eve night club, 1970s
Credit line
Given by Jimmy and Helen O'Brien
Object history
This costume was created for one of the sequences in a revue at Eve, a London night club. Eve was founded by Helen and Jimmy O'Brien in 1953. They had been members of another London club, Murray's Cabaret Club, and their designer, Ronald Cobb, had also worked for Murray's. Cobb designed and supervised the making of the showgirls' costumes from Eve's earliest days until its closure in 1992.
Summary
Eve was a small Central London night club which opened in 1953 and was well-known for its imaginative floor-shows. Its founder, Helen O'Brien, devised witty entertainments which contained all the elements traditionally associated with glamorous night clubs - music, dance and parades of attractive showgirls - but presented them in a highly original way. Her designer, Ronald Cobb, created the costumes for sequences with such unexpected themes as Shakespeare's plays, Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, and The Mind of Goya. The club appealed to a sophisticated audience that enjoyed spotting the references.



In the 1970s the majority of the Eve showgirls were topless. Their costumes were minimal but elaborate, no more than a headdress, sleeves and a G-string, but all incorporated amusing references and symbols appropriate to the theme. There may once have been sleeves with this costume but only the headdress and G-string survive.
Collection
Accession Number
S.695:1, 2-1996

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record createdJune 26, 2008
Record URL