Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Jewellery, Rooms 91, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery

Folded brooch

Brooch
2000 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Jane Adam's jewellery shows the extraordinary versatility of aluminium. Her extensive research into the properties of this metal and her fine appreciation of colour and line combine in the subtle colours and shimmering textures achieved in this brooch.

To create this effect the aluminium is first anodised by immersing it in a solution of sulphuric acid and water then passing an electric current through it. This forms a thin surface film of aluminium oxide which is very tough yet has microscopic pores which enable colouring dyes to be absorbed. After dying the surface is sealed. Shapes for jewellery are cut from the dyed and sealed sheet, and these are then compressed in a rolling mill, adding texture or crazing to the surface. As anodised aluminium cannot be soldered the assembling of a piece often requires the addition of minimal wires and findings to the design.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Etched, dyed, anodised and crazed aluminium, with moon gold leaf, silver and stainless steel
Brief Description
Folded brooch made from etched, dyed, anodised and crazed aluminium, with moon gold leaf, silver and stainless steel. Designed and made by Jane Adam, London, 2000.
Physical Description
Long, narrow brooch made from two overlapping pieces of anodised aluminium that have been etched, dyed and crazed. The upper flap has a striated pattern in purple and ochre, the lower in red and ochre. The inside surface is decorated with gold leaf.
Dimensions
  • Height: 12.86cm
  • Width: 1.53cm
  • Depth: 2.05cm
Credit line
Given in honour of Elizabeth Goring
Summary
Jane Adam's jewellery shows the extraordinary versatility of aluminium. Her extensive research into the properties of this metal and her fine appreciation of colour and line combine in the subtle colours and shimmering textures achieved in this brooch.



To create this effect the aluminium is first anodised by immersing it in a solution of sulphuric acid and water then passing an electric current through it. This forms a thin surface film of aluminium oxide which is very tough yet has microscopic pores which enable colouring dyes to be absorbed. After dying the surface is sealed. Shapes for jewellery are cut from the dyed and sealed sheet, and these are then compressed in a rolling mill, adding texture or crazing to the surface. As anodised aluminium cannot be soldered the assembling of a piece often requires the addition of minimal wires and findings to the design.
Collection
Accession Number
M.13-2008

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record createdMay 8, 2008
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