Gloves thumbnail 1
Gloves thumbnail 2
Not currently on display at the V&A

Gloves

1600-1625 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Gloves served several purposes in early 17th-century England. Many were solely decorative, to display the wealth and status of their owner. They were worn in the hat or belt, as well as carried in the hand. Gloves were popular as gifts and were often given by a young gallant to his favourite mistress. In combat, a glove might be thrown down as a challenge.

Silver-gilt thread, coloured silks, silver bobbin lace, spangles (the 17th century term for sequins) and ribbons cover the densely embroidered satin gauntlets of these gloves, in patterns of birds, squirrels and flowers. Many of the designs that appear in Jacobean embroidery were copied from emblem books and botanical picture books, popular at the time.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Glove
  • Glove
Materials and Techniques
Leather, with gauntlets of satin embroidered with silver-gilt and silk threads, trimmed with silver bobbin lace, spangles and ribbons
Brief Description
A pair of gloves, 1600-25, English; Leather, silk gauntlet embroidered with silk & metal thread
Physical Description
Embroidered in silk, silver-gilt and silver thread on satin, in long and short, and satin stitches, with couched work. On the six tabs are phoenixes and green birds resembling storks, with flowers. Below are two gold squirrels facing each other across a pink flower, with honeysuckle sprigs. There are fringes and trimming of gilt bobbin lace with spangles, and blue silk ribbon.
Dimensions
  • Length: 33.3cm (approx)
  • 907 1904 width: 21.5cm (approx)
  • 907 a 1904 length: 33.0cm (approx)
  • 907 a 1904 width: 20.8cm (approx)
Subjects depicted
Summary
Gloves served several purposes in early 17th-century England. Many were solely decorative, to display the wealth and status of their owner. They were worn in the hat or belt, as well as carried in the hand. Gloves were popular as gifts and were often given by a young gallant to his favourite mistress. In combat, a glove might be thrown down as a challenge.



Silver-gilt thread, coloured silks, silver bobbin lace, spangles (the 17th century term for sequins) and ribbons cover the densely embroidered satin gauntlets of these gloves, in patterns of birds, squirrels and flowers. Many of the designs that appear in Jacobean embroidery were copied from emblem books and botanical picture books, popular at the time.
Bibliographic Reference
John Lea Nevinson, Catalogue of English Domestic Embroidery of the Sixteenth & Seventeenth Centuries, Victoria and Albert Museum, Department of Textiles, London: HMSO, 1938, p.93
Collection
Accession Number
907&A-1904

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record createdDecember 15, 1999
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