Brooch thumbnail 1
Brooch thumbnail 2
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Jewellery, Rooms 91, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery

Brooch

ca. 1930 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The Parisian jeweller Raymond Templier (1891-1968) was one of a small group of innovative of Art Deco designers producing work in a minimal, geometric style that looked towards Cubism and the imagery of industrial production. In 1930 he commented in the Goldsmiths' Journal 'As I walk in the streets I see ideas for jewellery everywhere, the wheels, the cars, the machinery of today'. Such sources of inspiration resulted in a new visual language in jewellery and an aesthetic where strong and simple forms replaced intricate detailing.
read Art Deco fashion Distinct, elegant and vivid in colour, items from the V&A's fashion collections reveal the relationship between Art Deco design and the clothing and jewellery of the 1920s and 1930s. From Jeanne Lanvin's haute couture to the bold geometric jewellery of Raymond Templier, Art Deco's multiple...
object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
White gold, brilliant-cut diamonds, enamel and coral
Brief Description
Brooch of white gold, brilliant-cut diamonds, black enamel and coral, made by Raymond Templier, Paris, about 1930.
Physical Description
Brooch of white gold, rectangular with rounded ends, with a bar of brilliant-cut diamonds in the centre and a diagonal line of three domed discs of coral encircled by two curved sections of black enamel.
Dimensions
  • Height: 6.4cm
  • Width: 2.3cm
  • Depth: 1.2cm
Style
Credit line
Given by the American Friends of the V&A through the generosity of Patricia V. Goldstein
Summary
The Parisian jeweller Raymond Templier (1891-1968) was one of a small group of innovative of Art Deco designers producing work in a minimal, geometric style that looked towards Cubism and the imagery of industrial production. In 1930 he commented in the Goldsmiths' Journal 'As I walk in the streets I see ideas for jewellery everywhere, the wheels, the cars, the machinery of today'. Such sources of inspiration resulted in a new visual language in jewellery and an aesthetic where strong and simple forms replaced intricate detailing.
Other Numbers
  • LOAN:AMERICANFRIENDS.145-2003 - Previous loan number
  • 101 - Goldstein Collection number
Collection
Accession Number
M.134-2007

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record createdApril 24, 2008
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