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Ceiling

1580-1620 (made)

This ceiling came from the London house, built in 1600 for Sir Paul Pindar (1565? - 1650), a wealthy English merchant and the ambassador at Constantinople (now Istanbul) from 1611. His house was built outside the City walls in Bishopsgate, a relatively spacious and fashionable street. Like many London houses, it was much deeper than it was wide, with stables and a garden extending behind. The ground floor frontage was altered in suceeding centuries so only the upper two storeys were brought to the Museum (museum no. 846-1890). This plaster ceiling came from the second floor of the house. The house was pulled down in 1890 to make room for the enlargement of Liverpool Street railway station.


object details
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 3 parts.

  • Ceiling
  • Ceiling
  • Ceiling
Brief Description
Parts of the lime plaster 2nd floor ceiling from Sir Paul Pindar's house, English, 1580-1620.

Physical Description
3 sections of hand-modeled lime plaster ceiling with narrow rib design in a repeating pattern of circles and squares.

Dimensions
  • Height: 10.06m
  • Width: 5.78m
  • Maximum depth: 2.62m
Object history
Given by the Great Eastern Railway Co., Liverpool Street Station, London EC. (RF 8367/1890).



The ceiling of this room consisted of a design executed in narrow ribs, indicating that the room was of lower status than the great chamber below it. The rib design is identical with that in the great chamber at the Charterhouse of c1570, where circles and small squares are linked by straight ribs and ogee curves that divide the circles in a manner reminiscent of medieval tracery. Small bosses and leaves cover many of the intersections and rosettes are dotted within the circles. The rest of the decoration within the fields consists of cast motifs, all with stylised floral or foliate features:

1. a square of oak leaves and acorns in the centre of the small squares;

2. a rectangular panel in each of the half-fields of the circles. A strapwork cartouche contains paired birds flanking a bunch of grapes, with four rosettes in the border;

3. the sprigs that branch from each corner of the small squares have grotesque beaked bird heads among foliage. This motif was still being used at Forty Hall, Enfield, c1630.
Summary
This ceiling came from the London house, built in 1600 for Sir Paul Pindar (1565? - 1650), a wealthy English merchant and the ambassador at Constantinople (now Istanbul) from 1611. His house was built outside the City walls in Bishopsgate, a relatively spacious and fashionable street. Like many London houses, it was much deeper than it was wide, with stables and a garden extending behind. The ground floor frontage was altered in suceeding centuries so only the upper two storeys were brought to the Museum (museum no. 846-1890). This plaster ceiling came from the second floor of the house. The house was pulled down in 1890 to make room for the enlargement of Liverpool Street railway station.
Associated Object
Bibliographic Reference
Acquisition description: Three portions of a ceiling, of moulded plaster. From a house which formerly stood in Bishopsgate Without, and was built by Sir Paul Pindar, a wealthy London merchant. Each portion is divided by straight and curved moulded bands into various shaped compartments enclosing repetitions of the following designs: 1) A scrolled cartouche enriched with floral stems and bearing two birds pecking at grapes 2) Four oak stems radiating from a central leafy device 3) A group of lillies and other flowers amid which are grotesque birds' heads. The whole is enriched with pendant bosses. Portions of the rafters are attached. Dimensions 53-1902: 10' 6" x 4' 6 1/2" 53A-1902: 10' 4 1/2" x 4' 3" 53B-1902: 10' 4 3/4" x 4' 5" "All damaged" [1902] A note in the dept file states that it came from the second floor of the house, but the source for this information is not given.
Collection
Accession Number
53H to J-1902

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record createdOctober 18, 2019
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