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Not currently on display at the V&A

Cadogan

Teapot
ca. 1820-1842 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

The shapeof this teapot is known as "Cadogan" and it was copied from a Chinese porcelain wine-pot in the collection of the Earl of Cadogan. It was filled upside down through a tube running from the base into the upper part of the interior, so that it can be turned the right way up and no liquid will escape. These 'teapots' have also been called coffeepots but it is generally thought that they were probably used for hot water in the tea or coffee making process as they would have been difficult to clean if filled with a coloured liquid.

Object details

Category
Object type
TitleCadogan (popular title)
Materials and techniques
Lead-glazed earthenware
Brief description
'Cadogan' shape teapot, lead-glazed earthenware, made at the Rockingham Works, Swinton, ca. 1810-1830
Physical description
Teapot, lead-glazed earthenware with press-moulded body in the form of a peach and applied decoration of smaller peaches, flowers and foliage, painted with underglaze green
Dimensions
  • Height: 18cm
  • Width: 25cm
Marks and inscriptions
Brameld & Co. (Impressed to base. Mark of Rockingham works from 1806-1842)
Gallery label
Teapot Made at the Rockingham Works, Swinton, about 1810-30 Lead-glazed earthenware 3179-1901 Jermyn Street Collection The shape is known as "Cadogan" and is copied from a Chinese porcelain wine-pot in the collection of the Earl of Cadogan(23/05/2008)
Object history
Jermyn Street Collection.
Production
Made at the Rockingham Works, Swinton. The shape is known as "Cadogan" and is copied from a Chinese porcelain wine-pot in the collection of the Earl of Cadogan.
Subject depicted
Summary
The shapeof this teapot is known as "Cadogan" and it was copied from a Chinese porcelain wine-pot in the collection of the Earl of Cadogan. It was filled upside down through a tube running from the base into the upper part of the interior, so that it can be turned the right way up and no liquid will escape. These 'teapots' have also been called coffeepots but it is generally thought that they were probably used for hot water in the tea or coffee making process as they would have been difficult to clean if filled with a coloured liquid.
Collection
Accession number
3179-1901

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Record createdMarch 31, 2008
Record URL
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