Not currently on display at the V&A

American Elm, Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn

Photographs
2012 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This photograph is from the series New York Arbor, which shows idiosyncratic trees in New York City. The photographs challenge the perception of trees as decorative additions within the city space, instead depicting them centre stage. Epstein shows how trees have surprisingly survived amid a rapidly changing human environment, even as they are cornered by urban development. This elm seems simultaneously restricted, protected and embraced by its concrete support.
read About the Known & Strange display A photograph has the power to transform the familiar into the unfamiliar,  and to make the ordinary extraordinary.  Since its invention, photography has changed the way we see the world by inviting us to interpret reality in our own way.  Its creative capacity to blur fact with fiction is ...
object details
Category
Object Type
Additional TitleNew York Arbor (series title)
Materials and Techniques
Gelatin silver print
Brief Description
Photograph by Mitch Epstein, 'American Elm, Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn', from the series 'New York Arbor', 2012, gelatin silver print
Physical Description
Photograph of an elm tree located beside a road. The tree leans against a concrete support. There are housing apartments in the background.
Dimensions
  • Height: 1016mm
  • Width: 762mm
Credit line
Purchase funded by Mark Storey and Carey Adina Karmel in memory of George Sassower
Summary
This photograph is from the series New York Arbor, which shows idiosyncratic trees in New York City. The photographs challenge the perception of trees as decorative additions within the city space, instead depicting them centre stage. Epstein shows how trees have surprisingly survived amid a rapidly changing human environment, even as they are cornered by urban development. This elm seems simultaneously restricted, protected and embraced by its concrete support.
Collection
Accession Number
E.620-2019

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record createdApril 23, 2019
Record URL