Earrings thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Jewellery, Rooms 91, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery

Earrings

ca. 1820 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Once the prohibition against wearing jewels had passed in post-revolutionary France, light and delicate gold jewellery became fashionable. Inspired by traditional peasant jewellery, it used filigree, seed pearls and coloured stones, and in particular, carnelians.

Women’s dress had simplified with the influence of costume from classical Greece and Rome. Fine muslin fabrics draped the body, and a revealing low-cut bodice displayed coloured stones and filigree necklaces to good advantage. Hair was worn in a chignon (bun), with curls arranged around the forehead and face. With this style, women wore combs or tiaras and elongated hoop earrings, called ‘poissardes’ (French for ‘fishwives’).


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Earring
  • Earring
Materials and Techniques
Gold and yellow topaz
Brief Description
Pair of earrings of poissarde type, gold and yellow topaz, France about 1820.
Physical Description
Earring (poissarde type), gold and yellow topaz.
Dimensions
  • Height: 4.1cm
  • Width: 3.3cm
  • Depth: 0.6cm
Credit line
Given by the American Friends of the V&A through the generosity of Patricia V. Goldstein
Summary
Once the prohibition against wearing jewels had passed in post-revolutionary France, light and delicate gold jewellery became fashionable. Inspired by traditional peasant jewellery, it used filigree, seed pearls and coloured stones, and in particular, carnelians.



Women’s dress had simplified with the influence of costume from classical Greece and Rome. Fine muslin fabrics draped the body, and a revealing low-cut bodice displayed coloured stones and filigree necklaces to good advantage. Hair was worn in a chignon (bun), with curls arranged around the forehead and face. With this style, women wore combs or tiaras and elongated hoop earrings, called ‘poissardes’ (French for ‘fishwives’).
Other Number
31 - Goldstein Collection number
Collection
Accession Number
M.96:1, 2-2007

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdMarch 13, 2008
Record URL