Brooch and Hair Ornaments in Case thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Jewellery, Rooms 91, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery

This object consists of 3 parts, some of which may be located elsewhere.

Brooch and Hair Ornaments in Case

Place Of Origin

This brooch, made before 1895, and the later, matching hair ornaments in a case made in 1912-14, may have been given by the painter William Holman Hunt to his wife Edith. Holman Hunt was a founding member of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood of artists. He is now best remembered for his allegorical painting of Jesus 'The Light of the World'.

The jeweller Carlo Giuliano (1831-95) was originally associated with the Roman firm of Castellani. He was born in Naples but spent most of his working life in London, where he initially supplied work to other jewellers. In 1874 he opened his own shop on Piccadilly. There he sold pieces in the archaeological style and also items inspired by Tudor and Renaissance jewels. He was succeeded by his sons, Carlo Joseph and Arthur Alphonse Giuliano, in 1895, who continued the business until 1914. From 1912-14 their shop was at 48, Knightsbridge, London, the address which is printed on the silk of the case.

The marks on the jewels show that the brooch was made by Carlo Giuliano before 1895, and that the hair ornaments were made by his sons Carlo and Arthur Giuliano between 1895 and 1914. The three jewels are in a case made in 1912-14. It seems likely that the hair ornaments were made in 1912-14 to match the brooch and that a new case was made for all three items at the same time.

Coral was popular in jewellery of the 19th century. Most coral in Europe came from the sea around Naples and nearby Torre del Greco. In the 19th century it became a fashionable souvenir. This was partly because people could travel more once the Napoleonic wars had ended in 1815, but also due to the growing popularity of naturalistic jewellery in the 1850s.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 4 parts.

  • Brooch
  • Hair Ornament
  • Hair Ornament
  • Case
Materials and Techniques
Brief Description
Carved coral and enamel brooch and hair ornaments in case, London, 1875-1914
Credit line
Given by the American Friends of the V&A through the generosity of Judith H. Siegel
Summary
This brooch, made before 1895, and the later, matching hair ornaments in a case made in 1912-14, may have been given by the painter William Holman Hunt to his wife Edith. Holman Hunt was a founding member of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood of artists. He is now best remembered for his allegorical painting of Jesus 'The Light of the World'.



The jeweller Carlo Giuliano (1831-95) was originally associated with the Roman firm of Castellani. He was born in Naples but spent most of his working life in London, where he initially supplied work to other jewellers. In 1874 he opened his own shop on Piccadilly. There he sold pieces in the archaeological style and also items inspired by Tudor and Renaissance jewels. He was succeeded by his sons, Carlo Joseph and Arthur Alphonse Giuliano, in 1895, who continued the business until 1914. From 1912-14 their shop was at 48, Knightsbridge, London, the address which is printed on the silk of the case.



The marks on the jewels show that the brooch was made by Carlo Giuliano before 1895, and that the hair ornaments were made by his sons Carlo and Arthur Giuliano between 1895 and 1914. The three jewels are in a case made in 1912-14. It seems likely that the hair ornaments were made in 1912-14 to match the brooch and that a new case was made for all three items at the same time.



Coral was popular in jewellery of the 19th century. Most coral in Europe came from the sea around Naples and nearby Torre del Greco. In the 19th century it became a fashionable souvenir. This was partly because people could travel more once the Napoleonic wars had ended in 1815, but also due to the growing popularity of naturalistic jewellery in the 1850s.
Other Number
Collection
Accession Number
M.13:1 to 4-2011

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record createdFebruary 6, 2008
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