Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level C , Case MB2E, Shelf DR51

Derivadas de uma Imagem: Transformação em Grau Zero

Print
1971 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Waldemar Cordeiro (1925-1973) was born in Italy and trained at the School of Fine Arts in Rome. He emigrated to Brazil in 1949 and soon became a prominent member of the Brazilian avant garde scene as one of the main theorists and practitioners of concrete art in that country.

In 1968, he became one of the first Brazilian artists to use a computer to create images, when he gained access to an IBM 360/44 computer in the Physics Department of the University of São Paulo. The original image, of which this is a later print, is thought to be one of the first computer-generated artworks made in Brazil. It is one of a series of images created by Cordeiro, with physicist Giorgio Moscati. Using the IBM 360/44 mainframe computer, Cordeiro and Moscati transformed a photograph of a romantic young couple into symbols that create lighter and darker tones.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Additional TitleDerivatives of an Image: Transformation in Degree Zero (alternative title)
Materials and Techniques
Lithograph, after a computer generated impact print
Brief Description
Derivadas de uma Imagem: Transformação em Grau Zero (Derivatives of an Image: Transformation in Degree Zero), by Waldemar Cordeiro and Giorgio Moscati, lithograph after impact print, Brazil, 1971
Physical Description
Lithograph showing an image of a romantic young couple made up of symbols that create lighter and darker tones.
Dimensions
  • Height: 61cm
  • Length: 44.5cm
Marks and Inscriptions
  • 'Derivadas de uma Imagem' (Inscribed in pencil, below image)
  • 'Waldemar Cordeiro e Giorgio Moscati offset 1971' (Inscribed in pencil, below image)
Gallery Label
Chance and Control: Art in the Age of Computers (2018) WALDEMAR CORDEIRO (1925–73) AND GIORGIO MOSCATI (DATES UNKNOWN) Derivatives of an Image: Zero-Degree Transformation (Derivadas de uma Imagem: Transformação em Grau Zero) Brazil, made 1969, printed 1971 This is thought to be one of the first computer artworks made in Brazil. It is one of a series of images created by the Italian-born Brazilian artist Waldemar Cordeiro, with physicist Giorgio Moscati. Using an IBM mainframe computer, Cordeiro and Moscati transformed a photograph of a romantic young couple into symbols that create lighter and darker tones. Lithograph, after a computer-generated impact print Given by Thomas Cordeiro Guedes and Grégoire Cordeiro Belhassen through the Mayor Gallery Museum no. E.202-2018 (07/07/2018-18/11/2018)
Credit line
Given by Thomas Cordeiro Guedes and Grégoire Cordeiro Belhassen through the Mayor Gallery
Production
Made using an IMB 360/44 mainframe computer
Summary
Waldemar Cordeiro (1925-1973) was born in Italy and trained at the School of Fine Arts in Rome. He emigrated to Brazil in 1949 and soon became a prominent member of the Brazilian avant garde scene as one of the main theorists and practitioners of concrete art in that country.



In 1968, he became one of the first Brazilian artists to use a computer to create images, when he gained access to an IBM 360/44 computer in the Physics Department of the University of São Paulo. The original image, of which this is a later print, is thought to be one of the first computer-generated artworks made in Brazil. It is one of a series of images created by Cordeiro, with physicist Giorgio Moscati. Using the IBM 360/44 mainframe computer, Cordeiro and Moscati transformed a photograph of a romantic young couple into symbols that create lighter and darker tones.
Collection
Accession Number
E.202-2018

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record createdNovember 27, 2017
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