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Not currently on display at the V&A

Dress

1836-1838 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Wool was a popular fabric for winter day wear, as seen in this example. The dress is printed in a complicated design of shamrocks on a lilac and brown chequered ground. By the mid-1830s the puff of the full gigot sleeve was moving from the top of the arm to the elbow. (The gigot was a very full style of sleeve that tapered to a narrow circumference at the wrist.) These sleeves have stitch marks, which suggests that they were reworked from an earlier style to update the dress to the latest fashion. In order to keep the sleeve from sliding down the arm, there are tapes at the elbow holding the fullness of the puff in place.
read Corsets, crinolines and bustles: fashionable Victorian underwear
object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Printed wool, trimmed with printed wool, lined with cotton, hand-sewn
Physical Description
The fitted bodice has a low, round neck and a slightly high waistline. The skirt is box-pleated more tightly at the centre back. The sleeves are set low, tightly pleated below the shoulder. They have been altered by having the fullness reduced and a frill attached at the elbow. The sleeve puffs are stiffened with calico and supported with tapes. The main seams are faced, the bodice is lined with cotton and the skirt faced with glazed cotton.
Credit line
Given by Mrs H. M. Shepherd
Summary
Wool was a popular fabric for winter day wear, as seen in this example. The dress is printed in a complicated design of shamrocks on a lilac and brown chequered ground. By the mid-1830s the puff of the full gigot sleeve was moving from the top of the arm to the elbow. (The gigot was a very full style of sleeve that tapered to a narrow circumference at the wrist.) These sleeves have stitch marks, which suggests that they were reworked from an earlier style to update the dress to the latest fashion. In order to keep the sleeve from sliding down the arm, there are tapes at the elbow holding the fullness of the puff in place.
Collection
Accession Number
T.11-1935

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record createdDecember 15, 1999
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