Belt thumbnail 1
Belt thumbnail 2
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Jewellery, Rooms 91 to 93 mezzanine, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery

Belt

1850-1870 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Norwegian traditional jewellery is called bunadsølv (dress silver). Most of it has changed very little since medieval times. More women in Norway still own and wear traditional jewellery than in any other country in Europe. You can see jewellery like this being worn at weddings or on other social occasions to this day.

Stølebelter are belts made of cloth or cloth-covered leather, with metal mounts. The word 'støle' refers to these rectangular mounts. Some belts were used for daily wear, but belts like this one, with gilded silver plaques mounted on red cloth, were worn by brides on their wedding day. Married women continued to wear them on festive occasions throughout their life. They are medieval in origin. Stølebelter like this mainly come from central Norway.

The clasp on this belt is called a maljespenne, as it resembles a row of maljer, or bodice clasps. The belt was bought for £4 14s at the International Exhibition, London, in 1872.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Silver-gilt plaques on red cloth
Brief Description
Belt (stølebelt) of silver-gilt plaques on red cloth, Norway, 1850-1870.
Physical Description
Red cloth belt, lined with cream linen, with 21 hollow open-backed square plaques sewn to the front, each decorated with a stamped geometric pattern, and with two flat rings hanging from its lower edge. At the front is a clasp made from a row of four open domes, two on each side, like bodice fasteners, with a pendent disc hanging from the centre of each.
Dimensions
  • Length: 34.0cm
  • Width: 3.9cm
  • Depth: 3.0cm
Summary
Norwegian traditional jewellery is called bunadsølv (dress silver). Most of it has changed very little since medieval times. More women in Norway still own and wear traditional jewellery than in any other country in Europe. You can see jewellery like this being worn at weddings or on other social occasions to this day.



Stølebelter are belts made of cloth or cloth-covered leather, with metal mounts. The word 'støle' refers to these rectangular mounts. Some belts were used for daily wear, but belts like this one, with gilded silver plaques mounted on red cloth, were worn by brides on their wedding day. Married women continued to wear them on festive occasions throughout their life. They are medieval in origin. Stølebelter like this mainly come from central Norway.



The clasp on this belt is called a maljespenne, as it resembles a row of maljer, or bodice clasps. The belt was bought for £4 14s at the International Exhibition, London, in 1872.
Collection
Accession Number
1330-1873

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record createdJuly 13, 2007
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