Buckle thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Jewellery, Rooms 91, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery

Buckle

1898-1903 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Fabergé is famous for the enamelled and jewelled objects he made for Tsar Nicholas II and his wife Alexandra. He took over his father’s business in St Petersburg in 1872 and later also conducted extensive business through a London branch. In 1900 he won a gold medal at the Paris Exhibition. Fabergé’s carved hardstone figures and the superb quality of his enamelling influenced even the great French jewellery houses.

Like many 19th-century goldsmiths, Fabergé often found inspiration in earlier styles, including archaeological jewellery, the Baroque court of early 18th-century Dresden and France in the age of Louis XVI . Sometimes he is indebted to Russian traditions, or to the East.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Gold, silver, enamel and pearls
Brief Description
Buckle of enamelled gold and pearls, by Fabergé (mark of Mikhail Perkhin), St Petersburg, c.1900.
Physical Description
Long gold and silver buckle, with engine-turned decoration beneath yellow enamel and with pearls framing the central opening.
Dimensions
  • Height: 6.6cm
  • Width: 3.1cm
  • Depth: 0.6cm
Marks and Inscriptions
  • Mark of Workmaster: Mikhail Perkhin
  • Mark for St Petersburg 1896-1908
  • Mark of Fabergé
Credit line
Given by Ron and Mary Tarves
Summary
Fabergé is famous for the enamelled and jewelled objects he made for Tsar Nicholas II and his wife Alexandra. He took over his father’s business in St Petersburg in 1872 and later also conducted extensive business through a London branch. In 1900 he won a gold medal at the Paris Exhibition. Fabergé’s carved hardstone figures and the superb quality of his enamelling influenced even the great French jewellery houses.



Like many 19th-century goldsmiths, Fabergé often found inspiration in earlier styles, including archaeological jewellery, the Baroque court of early 18th-century Dresden and France in the age of Louis XVI . Sometimes he is indebted to Russian traditions, or to the East.
Collection
Accession Number
M.8-2007

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record createdJuly 12, 2007
Record URL