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Not currently on display at the V&A

Shoe

ca. 1925 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The 'Oxford' lace-up shoe was the predominant style in men's footwear during the 1920s. It was known in the trade as a 'closed tab shoe' because the eyelet tabs (the sections of leather with holes for the laces) were stitched under the front section of the shoe, or vamp, rather than on top of it.

Usually Oxfords were made up in black or brown leather for everyday wear. British footwear fashions were conservative during the 1920s with strict rules dictating what colour shoe could be worn with which outfit. Brown shoes with a dinner suit were frowned upon and flamboyance was considered distasteful. Bright red leather with striking gold swirls would have been considered highly unusual, even vulgar. These shoes were made up for display at the London International Shoe Fair in 1925 and may have been aimed at the American market which was open to more exotic designs.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Stitched and nailed leather with canvas lining
Brief Description
Man's lace-up Oxford shoe; red leather with gilt leather decoration and gold laces; Coxton Shoe Co. Ltd, Rushden, Northamptonshire, ca.1925
Physical Description
Man's Oxford lace-up shoe; red leather with gold leather decoration; rounded pointed toe, six eyelets, gold laces; red stitching on gold decorative strips at backstrap, toe-cap, facing, vamp and quarters; stacked heel (nailed), wheeled at join with brown leather sole; sole wheeled with scrolling pattern along edges of waist; green stripe between two red wheeled stripes running across widest point of waist.
Dimensions
  • Length: 28.5cm
  • Width: 9.5cm
  • Approx. height: 9.8cm
Marks and Inscriptions
'7' (Stamped on sole in middle of waist.)
Object history
Purchased. Registered File number 1994/1603.
Summary
The 'Oxford' lace-up shoe was the predominant style in men's footwear during the 1920s. It was known in the trade as a 'closed tab shoe' because the eyelet tabs (the sections of leather with holes for the laces) were stitched under the front section of the shoe, or vamp, rather than on top of it.



Usually Oxfords were made up in black or brown leather for everyday wear. British footwear fashions were conservative during the 1920s with strict rules dictating what colour shoe could be worn with which outfit. Brown shoes with a dinner suit were frowned upon and flamboyance was considered distasteful. Bright red leather with striking gold swirls would have been considered highly unusual, even vulgar. These shoes were made up for display at the London International Shoe Fair in 1925 and may have been aimed at the American market which was open to more exotic designs.
Collection
Accession Number
T.56-1996

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record createdMay 25, 2007
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