Not currently on display at the V&A

Waistcoat

1740s (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Women’s waistcoats were usually sleeveless like a man’s waistcoat, but shorter and shaped to fit over stays. Boned versions werer known as 'jumps' and worn informally at home in place of stays, together with a petticoat and bedgown. This example is made of silk quilted in a diaper pattern. Bright yellow was a popular colour for women’s dress from the 1740s to the 1770s. Quilting was a common type of needlework in the 18th century, as it was both decorative and practical. It can also be seen on petticoats and gowns. This waistcoat has a matching pair of pockets.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Silk, linen, baleen; hand-woven, hand-quilted, hand-sewn
Brief Description
Woman's waistcoat or jumps of quilted yellow silk, Great Britain, 1740s; boned
Physical Description
Woman’s waistcoat or jumps made of yellow silk taffeta, backed with yellow silk taffeta and bound with yellow grosgrain silk ribbon. It has a shallow V neckline and rounded skirts below the waist. Inside there are 5 canvas panels, 1 at centre back reinforced with 6 strips of baleen, 2 at each side with 4 strips of baleen and 1 on each front with 5 strips. The waistcoat is quilted in a diamond pattern with yellow silk floss in running stitch. There is a quilted border of a floral design along the front edges and skirt hems. It fastens at centre front with 11 worked lacing holes on each side.



This waistcoat is part of an ensemble with a matching pair of quilted yellow silk pockets (see T.87A&B-1978).
Dimensions
  • Waist measured inside garment circumference: 56cm (Note: Measured by Conservation)
  • Bust measured inside garment circumference: 72cm (Note: Measured by Conservation)
  • Nape waist length: 35cm (Note: Measured by Conservation)
Summary
Women’s waistcoats were usually sleeveless like a man’s waistcoat, but shorter and shaped to fit over stays. Boned versions werer known as 'jumps' and worn informally at home in place of stays, together with a petticoat and bedgown. This example is made of silk quilted in a diaper pattern. Bright yellow was a popular colour for women’s dress from the 1740s to the 1770s. Quilting was a common type of needlework in the 18th century, as it was both decorative and practical. It can also be seen on petticoats and gowns. This waistcoat has a matching pair of pockets.
Collection
Accession Number
T.87-1978

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record createdDecember 15, 1999
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