Hat thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Fashion, Room 40

Hat

1818-1823 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Early 19th-century etiquette required a lady’s head to be covered at all times, even with evening dress. A cap such as this one, gathered and full to suggest the shape of a turban, was popular for evening wear about 1820. The Romantic movement created an interest in the dress of non-European countries, particularly North Africa and the Middle East. Decorative motifs and accessories were borrowed to make current fashions more ‘exotic’. Although knowledge of the proper proportions and construction of a turban was not available to British milliners, the overall shape was approximated for the most fashionable headwear.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Silk, silk thread, paper, cotton, wire; hand-sewn
Physical Description
A full cap of white satin gathered into a headband in imitation of a turban. The crown is inset with white net embroidered in circles with white silk thread. The headband is of white satin with three horizontal tucks and edged with white silk plush. Trimmed on one side with artificial flowers made of wired green paper leaves and white muslin rosebuds
Dimensions
  • Approx. depth: 27.0cm
  • Approx. width: 25.0cm
  • Approx. height: 16.0cm
Credit line
Given by Henry Curtis
Summary
Early 19th-century etiquette required a lady’s head to be covered at all times, even with evening dress. A cap such as this one, gathered and full to suggest the shape of a turban, was popular for evening wear about 1820. The Romantic movement created an interest in the dress of non-European countries, particularly North Africa and the Middle East. Decorative motifs and accessories were borrowed to make current fashions more ‘exotic’. Although knowledge of the proper proportions and construction of a turban was not available to British milliners, the overall shape was approximated for the most fashionable headwear.
Collection
Accession Number
T.261-1926

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record createdMay 22, 2007
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