Cap thumbnail 1
Cap thumbnail 2
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images
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
South Asia, Room 41

Cap

Place Of Origin

In some regions of the Netherlands, Indian chintz was so popular that it became a vital element of local dress. In these areas chintz was recycled many times over. The smallest pieces were saved and sewn together to make children’s clothes, hats and tiny baby mittens. This woman's cap was made from leftover scraps of fabric, expertly pieced together.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Cotton, mordant and resist-dyed
Brief Description
Woman's cap, pieced from fragments of mordant and resist-dyed cotton (chintz), Coromandel Coast for the Dutch market, c.1720-1760; Textiles; Women's Clothes; Accessories
Physical Description
Cap of mordant and resist-dyed cotton (chintz). Patched from smaller fragments
Gallery Label
YOUNG WOMEN’S CAPS Cotton, mordant- and resist-dyed Coromandel Coast for the Dutch market c. 1720-60 In some regions of the Netherlands, Indian chintz was so popular that it became a vital element of local dress. In these areas chintz was recycled many times over. The smallest pieces were saved and sewn together to make children’s clothes, hats and tiny baby mittens. These three women’s caps were made from leftover scraps of fabric, expertly pieced together.(01/08/2017)
Credit line
Purchased with the support of the Friends of the V&A
Summary
In some regions of the Netherlands, Indian chintz was so popular that it became a vital element of local dress. In these areas chintz was recycled many times over. The smallest pieces were saved and sewn together to make children’s clothes, hats and tiny baby mittens. This woman's cap was made from leftover scraps of fabric, expertly pieced together.
Collection
Accession Number
IS.70-2016

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record createdMarch 10, 2016
Record URL