Obi thumbnail 1
Obi thumbnail 2
+8
images
Not currently on display at the V&A

Obi

Place of origin

Kimono are worn with a long waist sash called an obi which is tied at the back with a decorative knot. Tying an obi requires skill and from the mid-20th century obi with ready-made knots became an increasingly common, and easier, choice. This obi is pre-tied in the popular taiko musubi (drum knot) style, and has cotton ties to secure it around the waist and a hook at the back designed to slip into the under-sash. It is woven with a pattern of maple leaves and stylised waves. Worn with a summer kimono (FE.35-2015), this autumnal and water motif, together with the delicate green colour, was designed to provide a visual suggestion of coolness on a hot day.

Object details

Object type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Obi
  • Obi Cushion
Materials and techniques
Brief description
Tex, Japan, woven. Obi (kimono sash), pre-tied, woven with pattern of maple leaves on water
Physical description
Obi (kimono sash), pattern of maple leaves and stylised waves, twill weave green ground with white supplementary wefts; pre-tied with hook and ties to secure.

Dimensions
  • Width: 36.5cm
  • Length: 112cm
Credit line
Given by Sarah Brooks in memory of her mother Bernice Eileen (Wiese) Boo
Summary
Kimono are worn with a long waist sash called an obi which is tied at the back with a decorative knot. Tying an obi requires skill and from the mid-20th century obi with ready-made knots became an increasingly common, and easier, choice. This obi is pre-tied in the popular taiko musubi (drum knot) style, and has cotton ties to secure it around the waist and a hook at the back designed to slip into the under-sash. It is woven with a pattern of maple leaves and stylised waves. Worn with a summer kimono (FE.35-2015), this autumnal and water motif, together with the delicate green colour, was designed to provide a visual suggestion of coolness on a hot day.
Collection
Accession number
FE.36:1, 2-2015

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest feedback

Record createdMay 22, 2015
Record URL
Download as: JSONIIIF Manifest