Not currently on display at the V&A

Fireplace Surround

ca. 1873 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Thomas Jeckyll trained as an architect and was active, both as an architect and designer, in London and Norfolk. In the 1860s he came into contact with James Abbot McNeil Whistler (1834-1903) and E. W. Godwin (1833-1886). By the 1870s, Jeckyll was one of the leading architects of the Aesthetic Movement. He designed an interior for the Holland Park house of the collector, Alexander Ionides (1833-1900) (who bequeathed much of his collection of paintings to the V&A) and the dining room of a house in Princes Gate. (Due to its later painted decoration by Whistler, this room became known as the Peacock Room, and is currently on display in the Freer Art Gallery, Washington, D.C.) Jeckyll became mentally unstable in 1877 and died in an asylum in 1881.

The Aesthetic or Art Movement was triggered by the display of Japanese decorative art at the London International Exhibition of 1862. Strongly influenced by Japanese design, the Aesthetic Movement was a reaction to the Gothic revival of the mid-19th century. In the new movement, the pursuit of 'art for art's sake' became a justifiable goal in itself. The Aesthetic Movement was established when the magazine Punch paid it the tribute of making a mockery of it.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Cast brass
Brief Description
Cast brass, made by Barnard, Bishop and Barnard, Norwich, designed by Thomas Jeckyll, 1873.
Physical Description
Fireplace surround, cast brass decorated with a series of circular, Japanese inspired motifs.
Dimensions
  • Height: 94cm
  • Width: 92cm
Marks and Inscriptions
  • Three Bs superimposed for Barnard, Bishop and Barnard of Norwich. (Cast in the back.)
  • A diamond shaped Design Registry mark for 1873. (Cast in the back.)
Credit line
Formerly in the collection of Charles and Lavinia Handley-Read
Historical context
Thomas Jekyll (1827-1881) designed a large number of similar fire surrounds in the Japanese taste for Barnard, Bishop and Barnard
Summary
Thomas Jeckyll trained as an architect and was active, both as an architect and designer, in London and Norfolk. In the 1860s he came into contact with James Abbot McNeil Whistler (1834-1903) and E. W. Godwin (1833-1886). By the 1870s, Jeckyll was one of the leading architects of the Aesthetic Movement. He designed an interior for the Holland Park house of the collector, Alexander Ionides (1833-1900) (who bequeathed much of his collection of paintings to the V&A) and the dining room of a house in Princes Gate. (Due to its later painted decoration by Whistler, this room became known as the Peacock Room, and is currently on display in the Freer Art Gallery, Washington, D.C.) Jeckyll became mentally unstable in 1877 and died in an asylum in 1881.



The Aesthetic or Art Movement was triggered by the display of Japanese decorative art at the London International Exhibition of 1862. Strongly influenced by Japanese design, the Aesthetic Movement was a reaction to the Gothic revival of the mid-19th century. In the new movement, the pursuit of 'art for art's sake' became a justifiable goal in itself. The Aesthetic Movement was established when the magazine Punch paid it the tribute of making a mockery of it.
Bibliographic Reference
Jervis, Simon, Victorian and Edwardian decorative art: the Handley-Read collection, London, Royal Academy of Arts, 1972p.76
Collection
Accession Number
M.49-1972

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record createdNovember 15, 2006
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