Painting thumbnail 1
Painting thumbnail 2
+1
images
Not currently on display at the V&A

Painting

ca. 1610 - ca. 1620 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This Mughal painting of an unknown European was probably painted in the first half of the reign of the emperor Jahangir (1605-1627). The Western elements of the man's clothes, and the style of his European sword, are broadly dateable to the 1590s, suggesting that the anonymous Mughal artist based his painting on a Western portrait. However, the loose, voluminous trousers are the kind worn by Europeans living in India and adapting their clothes to the climate, making any conclusions about the artist's inspiration tentative. The subject's overall appearance, and the colours of his clothes, are similar to another portrait of a European in the V&A, IM 386-1914.
The painting was bought from Mr Arthur Churchill in 1913 as a portrait of Sir Thomas Roe, who arrived in India in 1616 as the first official English ambassador to the Mughal court, but does not resemble his appearance in authentic English portraits.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Painted in opaque watercolour on paper
Brief Description
Painting, European man in landscape, opaque watercolour on paper, Mughal, ca. 1610-1620
Physical Description
One of two paintings, on either side of the same piece of paper, in opaque watercolour. On this side, a bearded man stands obliquely against a landscape, leaning on a long sword of European style, dressed in baggy trousers, white shirt with soft ruffle and open at the neck, European style jacket and black velvet cap. In the background are two hills with small figures climbing up the paths towards a shrine at left and a small town at right.
Dimensions
  • Estimate height: 24.2cm
  • Estimate width: 26.3cm
Dimensions taken from Catalogue of Foreign Paintings, I. Before 1800, C.M. Kauffmann, Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 1973
Content description
On one side, a bearded man stands obliquely against a landscape, leaning on a long sword of European style, dressed in baggy trousers, white shirt with soft ruffle and open at the neck, European style jacket and black velvet cap. In the background are two hills with small figures climbing up the paths towards a shrine at left and a small town at right.
Style
Object history
Bought from Mr Arthur Churchill, with other paintings (IM.7-16-1913) for £141. RP 1913/1031
Subject depicted
Summary
This Mughal painting of an unknown European was probably painted in the first half of the reign of the emperor Jahangir (1605-1627). The Western elements of the man's clothes, and the style of his European sword, are broadly dateable to the 1590s, suggesting that the anonymous Mughal artist based his painting on a Western portrait. However, the loose, voluminous trousers are the kind worn by Europeans living in India and adapting their clothes to the climate, making any conclusions about the artist's inspiration tentative. The subject's overall appearance, and the colours of his clothes, are similar to another portrait of a European in the V&A, IM 386-1914.

The painting was bought from Mr Arthur Churchill in 1913 as a portrait of Sir Thomas Roe, who arrived in India in 1616 as the first official English ambassador to the Mughal court, but does not resemble his appearance in authentic English portraits.
Associated Objects
Bibliographic References
  • Susan Stronge, Painting for the Mughal Emperor. The art of the book 1560-1650, V&A Publications, pl. 106, p. 139.
  • Chandramani Singh, "European Themes in Early Mughal Miniatures", Chhavi Golden Jubilee Volume, Bharat Kala Bhavan 1920-1970, Benares, 1971, fig. 590
  • Irwin, John , Art & the East India Trade; Victoria & Albert Museum,, HMSO, London, 1970no. 2
Collection
Accession Number
IM.9-1913

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdAugust 21, 2006
Record URL