Not currently on display at the V&A

Mr. Hampton's Ascent from Cremorne House, Chelsea. Thursday Jujne 13, 1839.

Print
1839 (printed)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The ascent of hydrogen and hot-air balloons was a popular attraction at London's pleasure gardens during the 19th century, and finding safe methods of descending from the balloons was a contemporary concern in the 1830s. This illustration, the front cover of the magazine The Mirror, or, Literature, Amusement and Instruction for Saturday June 15, 1839, shows various views of John Hampton's Albion Balloon's ascent and descent at Cremorne House, Chelsea on 13 June 1839. His balloon is shown attached to the parachute below, in which Mr. Hampton is standing.

John Hampton (b.1799) was in the navy before he began his career as an astronaut with an ascent from the Eyre Arms Tavern, St. John's Wood, on 7 June 1838. After various mishaps, including landing in the sea and being rescued by boat after an ascent from Rochester, Hampton developed his parachute which he first exhibited and used in an ascent from the Montpellier Gardens, Cheltenham, on 3 October 1838, becoming the first Englishman to make a successful parachute jump.

Hampton's parachute was based on Garnerin’s ‘umbrella’ design, consisting of a canvas envelope stretched over a framework of whalebone ribs and bamboo stretchers, attached by a copper tube to a small wicker car. John Hampton retired in 1852, unlike Robert Cocking whose attempt to descend in a similarly-designed parachute had resulted in his death on 24 July 1837.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Additional Title
Materials and Techniques
Printed ink on paper
Brief Description
The Mirror, or, Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, 25 June 1839, Vol.xxxiii, No.953, the front page illustrated with an etching entitled: 'Mr. Hampton's Ascent from Cremorne House, Chelsea', showing various views of the Albion Balloon with its inventor John Hampton and his parachute in his balloon and descending from it at Cremorne Gardens on 13 June 1839. Gabrielle Enthoven Collection.
Physical Description
Black and white etching with six images of Mr. Hampton's Albion Balloon on its ascent and his descent to earth in the attached parachute. It is complete with the entire issue of the magazine The Mirror, or, Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, No.953, Vol. xxxiii, Saturday June 15th, 1839, with an article entitled 'Mr. Hampton's Descent in a Parachute, at Cremorne House, King's Road, Chelsea' on p.376.
Dimensions
  • Height: 21.0cm
  • Width: 13.5cm
Credit line
Gabrielle Enthoven Collection
Summary
The ascent of hydrogen and hot-air balloons was a popular attraction at London's pleasure gardens during the 19th century, and finding safe methods of descending from the balloons was a contemporary concern in the 1830s. This illustration, the front cover of the magazine The Mirror, or, Literature, Amusement and Instruction for Saturday June 15, 1839, shows various views of John Hampton's Albion Balloon's ascent and descent at Cremorne House, Chelsea on 13 June 1839. His balloon is shown attached to the parachute below, in which Mr. Hampton is standing.



John Hampton (b.1799) was in the navy before he began his career as an astronaut with an ascent from the Eyre Arms Tavern, St. John's Wood, on 7 June 1838. After various mishaps, including landing in the sea and being rescued by boat after an ascent from Rochester, Hampton developed his parachute which he first exhibited and used in an ascent from the Montpellier Gardens, Cheltenham, on 3 October 1838, becoming the first Englishman to make a successful parachute jump.



Hampton's parachute was based on Garnerin’s ‘umbrella’ design, consisting of a canvas envelope stretched over a framework of whalebone ribs and bamboo stretchers, attached by a copper tube to a small wicker car. John Hampton retired in 1852, unlike Robert Cocking whose attempt to descend in a similarly-designed parachute had resulted in his death on 24 July 1837.

Other Number
PPUK 648
Collection
Accession Number
S.684-2012

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record createdAugust 24, 2012
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