View in Limburg

Oil Painting
1863 (painted)
View in Limburg thumbnail 1
Not currently on display at the V&A

Artist/Maker

Although primarily a landscape and architectural painter, John Lewis Wood (1813-1901) was also known as a lithographer. His work is reminiscent, particularly in early years, of that of the watercolourist and lithographer Thomas Shotter Boys. Wood exhibited at numerous institutions throughout his career, including the New Watercolour Society, at which he exhibited over 200 works, and the Royal Academy. In all he showed 40 works at the Royal Academy, most of which were architectural subjects. For many years he also exhibited English landscape paintings at Burlington House. Wood became an associate of New Society of Painters in Watercolours in 1866, gaining full membership in 1870. He rescinded this in 1888 having exhibited for the last time at the Society the year before.

Wood first visited the Continent in 1836 in an expedition that proved inspiring, and for the rest of his career the small towns and villages of Belgium, Normandy and Brittany became the primary subjects of his work.

This work illustrates Wood’s interest in architecture, particularly that of Northern Europe. This scene has been tentatively been identified as Limburg an der Lahn, Germany. In this painting the artist accentuates the quaint and rustic qualities of the architecture, probably to appeal to a British market.

Sources:

H.L. Mallalieu, The Dictionary of British Water Colour Artists up to 1920 (Woodbridge: Antiques Collectors’ Club, 1976-9), p.283

Bryan’s Dictionary of Painters and Engravers, Volume 5, (London: George Bell & Sons, 1905), pp.392-3


object details
Category
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Oil on canvas
Brief Description
Oil on canvas, 'View in Limburg', John Lewis Wood, 1863
Physical Description
Oil on canvas depicting a view in Limburg.
Dimensions
  • Approx. height: 23.75in
  • Approx. width: 17.5in
Style
Credit line
Bequeathed by Joshua Dixon
Object history
Bequeathed by Joshua Dixon, 1886



British Institution 1863 no.546 'Limburg on the Lahn', £35
Subjects depicted
Summary
Although primarily a landscape and architectural painter, John Lewis Wood (1813-1901) was also known as a lithographer. His work is reminiscent, particularly in early years, of that of the watercolourist and lithographer Thomas Shotter Boys. Wood exhibited at numerous institutions throughout his career, including the New Watercolour Society, at which he exhibited over 200 works, and the Royal Academy. In all he showed 40 works at the Royal Academy, most of which were architectural subjects. For many years he also exhibited English landscape paintings at Burlington House. Wood became an associate of New Society of Painters in Watercolours in 1866, gaining full membership in 1870. He rescinded this in 1888 having exhibited for the last time at the Society the year before.



Wood first visited the Continent in 1836 in an expedition that proved inspiring, and for the rest of his career the small towns and villages of Belgium, Normandy and Brittany became the primary subjects of his work.



This work illustrates Wood’s interest in architecture, particularly that of Northern Europe. This scene has been tentatively been identified as Limburg an der Lahn, Germany. In this painting the artist accentuates the quaint and rustic qualities of the architecture, probably to appeal to a British market.



Sources:



H.L. Mallalieu, The Dictionary of British Water Colour Artists up to 1920 (Woodbridge: Antiques Collectors’ Club, 1976-9), p.283



Bryan’s Dictionary of Painters and Engravers, Volume 5, (London: George Bell & Sons, 1905), pp.392-3

Collection
Accession Number
996-1886

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record createdJune 14, 2006
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