Samson and Delilah (after Van Dyck) thumbnail 1
Not currently on display at the V&A

Samson and Delilah (after Van Dyck)

Oil Painting
ca. 1810-1830 (painted)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The story of Samson and Delilah comes from the book of Judges in the Old Testment of the Bible. It has become a popular subject for artistic interpretation as it combines the dramatic themes of love and betrayal. Samson, the Jewish hero, fell in love with Delila who is bribed by the philistines to betray hime into their hands. She discovers that his incredible strength comes from his uncut hair whereupon she arranges for it to be cut whilst he sleeps. Samson, drained of his strength, is thus captured by the Philistines This painting is a copy after a work by Anthony Van Dyck and depicts the moment immediately before Samson's hair is shorn. Van Dyck's picture was probably painted about1619-20, while he was working in the studio of Peter Paul Rubens. The composition derives from Rubens's treatment of the subject in the National Gallery, London of about1609, but the composition is reversed and is therefore probably taken from the print by Jacob Matham.


object details
Category
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Oil on canvas
Brief Description
Oil on canvas, 'Samson and Delilah', William Hilton RA (after Van Dyck), ca. 1810-1830
Physical Description
Oil on canvas; scene of Samson with his head in the lap of Delilah having his hair cut by the philistines - a man stands above him brandishing a pair of scissors whilst two figures peer over Delilah's shoulder and soldiers wait behind a pillar on the far left.
Dimensions
  • Estimate height: 52.5in
  • Estimate width: 78in
Credit line
Given by Helen Tatlock
Object history
Given by Helen Tatlock, 1872
Subjects depicted
Summary
The story of Samson and Delilah comes from the book of Judges in the Old Testment of the Bible. It has become a popular subject for artistic interpretation as it combines the dramatic themes of love and betrayal. Samson, the Jewish hero, fell in love with Delila who is bribed by the philistines to betray hime into their hands. She discovers that his incredible strength comes from his uncut hair whereupon she arranges for it to be cut whilst he sleeps. Samson, drained of his strength, is thus captured by the Philistines This painting is a copy after a work by Anthony Van Dyck and depicts the moment immediately before Samson's hair is shorn. Van Dyck's picture was probably painted about1619-20, while he was working in the studio of Peter Paul Rubens. The composition derives from Rubens's treatment of the subject in the National Gallery, London of about1609, but the composition is reversed and is therefore probably taken from the print by Jacob Matham.
Collection
Accession Number
257-1872

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record createdApril 20, 2006
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