Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Ceramics, Room 139, The Curtain Foundation Gallery

"The Water Lily" pattern from "Darwin" service

Dish
1808-1811 (made), 1806 (designed)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Earthenware dish transfer-printed in brown with botanical composition of three water plants (Nymphaea stellata, Nymphaea lotus, Nelumbium speciosum – now known as Nelumbo nucifera), derived from prints in the Botanist’s Repository and the Botanical Magazine 1803-06.
Original drawing for the Nelumbo by Sydenham Edwards. Pattern probably engraved by Semei Bourne.
Dish border decorated with design of interlocking ovals.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Earthenware, transfer-printed and overpainted with touches of iron red enamel and gilding
Brief Description
Dish, earthenware, transfer-printed and gilded, 'The Water Lily' pattern, Josiah Wedgwood & Sons, Etruria, made 1808-1811.
Physical Description
Earthenware dish transfer-printed in brown with botanical composition of three water plants (Nymphaea stellata, Nymphaea lotus, Nelumbium speciosum – now known as Nelumbo nucifera), derived from prints in the Botanist’s Repository and the Botanical Magazine 1803-06.

Original drawing for the Nelumbo by Sydenham Edwards. Pattern probably engraved by Semei Bourne.

Dish border decorated with design of interlocking ovals.
Dimensions
  • Diameter: 12.5in
Marks and Inscriptions
'WEDGWOOD' (Impressed)
Gallery Label
Dish Made at the factory of Josiah Wedgwood, Etruria, Staffordshire, about 1808-11 Mark: 'WEDGWOOD', impressed Earthenware printed in brown with touches of iron red enamel and gilt C.139-1963 Given by Mrs Margery Hooker From the Darwin service, which descended from Dr. Robert Waring Darwin through Dr. Joseph Hooker.(23/05/2008)
Credit line
Given by Mrs Margery Hooker
Object history
Traditionally said to have come from a service made about 1781 by Josiah (I) Wedgwood for the second marriage of his friend Dr. Erasmus Darwin, but now thought much more likely to have been designed by John Wedgwood (founder of what later became the Royal Horticultural Society) and ordered by Dr. Robert Darwin (son of Erasmus, and father of Charles Darwin) and his wife Susanna. The service was then inherited by Dr. Joseph Hooker, a descendant of Dr. Darwin. Another dish from the service was presented to the British Museum by Sir A.W. Franks who had been given it by Dr. Hooker.
Bibliographic References
  • Hugh Tait, Proceedings of the Wedgwood Society, London, vo.4, 1961
  • Una des Fontaines, "The Darwin Service and the first printed floral patterns at Etruria" in Proceedings of the Wedgwood Society, London, no.6, 1966
Collection
Accession Number
C.139-1963

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record createdFebruary 16, 2006
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