Bracelet thumbnail 1
Bracelet thumbnail 2
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Jewellery, Rooms 91, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery

Bracelet

ca. 1875 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

By the 1850s bracelets had become an indispensable accessory. The French connoisseur Edmond Joly de Bammeville declared that the ‘daytime’ bracelet was the ‘main feature of national dress’ in England. Up to seven or eight of differing design might be worn between the wrist and elbow on both arms. Alternatively, they could be worn in pairs and even over gloves.

Distinctions of rank, age, occasion and dress determined what jewellery could be worn and when. One etiquette manual stated that diamonds, pearls and emeralds were for full evening wear only. In the daytime, women were expected to wear less elaborate jewellery.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Brilliantand rose-cut diamonds and pearls set in gold with black enamel
Brief Description
Necklace, brilliant and rose-cut diamonds and pearls set in gold with black enamel fillet, ca. 1875
Physical Description
Bracelet of brilliant and rose-cut diamonds and pearls set in gold with black enamel fillet.
Dimensions
  • Height: 2.7cm
  • Width: 6.2cm
  • Depth: 6.8cm
Credit line
Cory Bequest
Summary
By the 1850s bracelets had become an indispensable accessory. The French connoisseur Edmond Joly de Bammeville declared that the ‘daytime’ bracelet was the ‘main feature of national dress’ in England. Up to seven or eight of differing design might be worn between the wrist and elbow on both arms. Alternatively, they could be worn in pairs and even over gloves.



Distinctions of rank, age, occasion and dress determined what jewellery could be worn and when. One etiquette manual stated that diamonds, pearls and emeralds were for full evening wear only. In the daytime, women were expected to wear less elaborate jewellery.
Collection
Accession Number
M.109-1951

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record createdFebruary 9, 2006
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