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Computer composition with lines

Photograph
1964 (made), 1970s (printed)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

This is a photographic print of a computer-generated image originally created by A. Michael Noll in 1964, at Bell Labs, Murray Hill, New Jersey. The artist has stated that "This work closely mimics the painting "Composition With Lines" by Piet Mondrian. When reproductions of both works were shown to 100 people, the majority preferred the computer version and believed it was done by Mondrian."


Object details
Categories
Object type
Materials and techniques
Photography
Brief description
Photographic print, 'Computer Composition with Lines', by A. Michael Noll, New Jersey, 1964



Physical description
Black and white photograph of a computer-generated image with small black lines forming a central circle. The image resembles 'Composition With Lines' by Piet Mondrian.
Dimensions
  • Height: 28cm
  • Length: 21.8cm
Gallery label
Chance and Control: Art in the Age of Computers (2018) A. MICHAEL NOLL (born 1939) Computer Composition with Lines USA, made 1964, printed 1970s A. Michael Noll created this computer-generated version of Piet Mondrian’s Composition in Line to determine whether computers could mimic artistic creativity. He showed a copy of Mondrian’s artwork alongside the machine-made image and asked 100 participants to guess which was the original. Only 28% of them correctly identified the Mondrian. Noll observed that people associated ‘the randomness of the computer-generated picture with human creativity’. Photographic print of a computer-generated image Given by the artist Museum no. E.35-2011(07/07/2018-18/11/2018)
Credit line
Gift of A. Michael Noll © AMN 1965
Summary
This is a photographic print of a computer-generated image originally created by A. Michael Noll in 1964, at Bell Labs, Murray Hill, New Jersey. The artist has stated that "This work closely mimics the painting "Composition With Lines" by Piet Mondrian. When reproductions of both works were shown to 100 people, the majority preferred the computer version and believed it was done by Mondrian."
Collection
Accession number
E.35-2011

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Record createdMarch 28, 2011
Record URL
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