Tri-Ang Milk Float thumbnail 1
Tri-Ang Milk Float thumbnail 2
Not currently on display at the V&A

Tri-Ang Milk Float

late 1960's (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This toy milk float was given to Andrew Bailey (b.14/03/1964) by his parents. The family would have had its milk delivered at the time by a very similar full size milk float. The milkman, Mr Warner, had started his business in the Hackney Road, just around the corner from the Museum. He painted his floats red and had them drawn by grey horses, so echoing the colours associated with London's Fire Brigade engines. The milk was delivered by train to Cambridge Heath station which is at a high level. Mr Warner suggested that he and the railway split the cost of a lift to enable the milk churns to be more easily taken to street level. This was accomplished and the fact marked by a metal plate fixed to the lift.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 10 parts.

  • Milk Float
  • Bottles
  • Bottles
  • Bottles
  • Bottles
  • Bottles
  • Cartons
  • Cartons
  • Containers
  • Churns
Brief Description
Tri-ang steel 'Express Dairies' toy milk float with rubber tyres, milk bottles and food packets, made in England by Lines Bros, late 1960s.
Production typeMass produced
Credit line
Given by Markham Henry Bailey
Object history
Purchased from Bradley's in Fore Street Edmonton in about 1969.
Historical context
This vehicle is based on the design of the 'Pedestrian-Controlled Electric Delivery Truck', known as a PEDT.
Summary
This toy milk float was given to Andrew Bailey (b.14/03/1964) by his parents. The family would have had its milk delivered at the time by a very similar full size milk float. The milkman, Mr Warner, had started his business in the Hackney Road, just around the corner from the Museum. He painted his floats red and had them drawn by grey horses, so echoing the colours associated with London's Fire Brigade engines. The milk was delivered by train to Cambridge Heath station which is at a high level. Mr Warner suggested that he and the railway split the cost of a lift to enable the milk churns to be more easily taken to street level. This was accomplished and the fact marked by a metal plate fixed to the lift.
Collection
Accession Number
B.1:1 to 10-2010

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record createdFebruary 1, 2011
Record URL