After Willow

Plate
2005 (made)
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Ceramics, Room 140, Factory Ceramics
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The Willow Pattern was first developed in England around 1800. It remains one of the most popular and immediately recognisable ceramic designs. Here, architectural ceramicist Robert Dawson takes elements from the iconic pattern – pagodas, Chinese figures crossing a bridge, two lovebirds – and uses digital technology to distort and make us look afresh at the familiar imagery.


object details
Category
Object Type
Additional TitleBridge (manufacturer's title)
Materials and Techniques
Bone china, transfer-printed in enamel
Brief Description
Plate, bone china, transfer-printed in enamel, 'Bridge', designed by Robert Dawson, made by Josiah Wedgwood & Sons, Stoke-on-Trent, 2005.
Physical Description
Bone china plate transfer-printed in blue with a detail taken from the 'Willow' pattern.
Dimensions
  • Diameter: 27cm
Marks and Inscriptions
Wedwood trademark of a 'W' framing the Portland vase, below which 'WEDGWOOD' with the registered trademark symbol of a circled 'R', and 'No. 4 BRIDGE / BONE CHINA / DISHWASHER AND / MICROWAVE SAFE' / the copyright symbol of a circled 'C' and 'WEDGWOOD' and 'ROBERT DAWSON / AFTER WILLOW PATTERN / ORIGINAL 1806', followed by the approved for food use symbol of a glass and fork, the complete mark printed in black on the plate back
Credit line
Given by Josiah Wedgwood and Sons
Summary
The Willow Pattern was first developed in England around 1800. It remains one of the most popular and immediately recognisable ceramic designs. Here, architectural ceramicist Robert Dawson takes elements from the iconic pattern – pagodas, Chinese figures crossing a bridge, two lovebirds – and uses digital technology to distort and make us look afresh at the familiar imagery.
Collection
Accession Number
C.303-2009

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record createdFebruary 1, 2011
Record URL