Ring thumbnail 1
Ring thumbnail 2
Not currently on display at the V&A

Ring

late 16th century-early 17th century (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The hoop of this ring can be divided into two interlocked circles. Rings made in this way are called gimmel rings, from the Latin word for twin. These rings were especially popular as love gifts, the join of the hoops symbolising the bond between lovers. The two hoops are inscribed 'WER MICH VA-ER DENCK SEINIT' and 'DECHTER S SOV- OSER MEIN' - which though difficult to translate, appears to be a romantic posy.

When open, the bezel of this ring reveals a small cavity. A similar ring in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum, New York holds a tiny enamelled baby on one side and a skeleton on the other, a reminder of the human trajectory from birth to death.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Gold, enamelled and set with a table-cut diamond, a ruby and sapphire and emerald
Brief Description
Gold gimmel ring with a pyramidal bezel divisible into two, cusped and enamelled with moresques on the sides and shoulders and set with a table-cut diamond, a ruby and a sapphire and emerald, Germany, late 16th to early 17th century
Physical Description
Gold gimmel ring with a pyramidal bezel divisible into two, cusped and enamelled with moresques on the sides and shoulders and set with a table-cut diamond, a ruby and a sapphire and emerald. The two hoops are inscribed 'WER MICH VA-ER DENCK SEINIT' and 'DECHTER S SOV- OSER MEIN'.
Dimensions
  • Height: 3cm
  • Width: 2.5cm
  • Depth: 0.9cm
Marks and Inscriptions
  • 'WER MICH VA-ER DENCK SEINIT' (Inscribed on the hoop.)
  • 'DECHTER S SOV- OSER MEIN' (Inscribed on the hoop.)
Subject depicted
Summary
The hoop of this ring can be divided into two interlocked circles. Rings made in this way are called gimmel rings, from the Latin word for twin. These rings were especially popular as love gifts, the join of the hoops symbolising the bond between lovers. The two hoops are inscribed 'WER MICH VA-ER DENCK SEINIT' and 'DECHTER S SOV- OSER MEIN' - which though difficult to translate, appears to be a romantic posy.



When open, the bezel of this ring reveals a small cavity. A similar ring in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum, New York holds a tiny enamelled baby on one side and a skeleton on the other, a reminder of the human trajectory from birth to death.
Collection
Accession Number
22-1865

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record createdNovember 17, 2005
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